Chess history trivia

Historical knowledge and information regarding our great game.
John Townsend
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Re: Chess history trivia

Postby John Townsend » Sun Nov 27, 2016 8:16 pm

Yes, indeed, David. Well done!

Gary Kenworthy

Re: Chess history trivia

Postby Gary Kenworthy » Mon Nov 28, 2016 9:45 pm

Some more context on Morphy's world of the ACW and why I think he was stressed, especially if he really was a Confederate diplomat passing through Union lines. (He had a great memory, so did not need incriminating papers).

As a Bradford schoolboy, it always stuck me odd that Admiral Farragut (on the USS Hartford), choose as his lead ship the USS Tecumseh, the middle name of Sherman. General Sherman was the first general who understood the first modern war. British military historian B. H. Liddell Hart famously declared that Sherman was "the first modern general" when reviewing “Memoirs” (1875) by W T Sherman.

The Mobile incident in USA Naval history is more famous than say the “Fighting” Temeraire (as painted by J M W Turner) which saved HMS Victory at Cape Trafalgar (1805).

The economic blockade of the South by such battles, was similar to Jutland (1916). Jutland which also led to mass starvation and destitution in Central Europe (e.g. Carl Schlechter – chessplayer, was not the only one to starve to death). In the ACW the South also ended up a complete post war similar mess with radical extremism and politics (of the far right, in a natural poisonous cauldron of racial hate.)

What Sherman understood were points and objectives like. The infrastructure and ability to sustain a war. The destruction of the communication infrastructure, like rail and telegraph wires. The techniques of Union troops and raiders, to bend heated rails around telegraph poles. The cutting of Morse telegraph lines was a key objective. Battle field communications and intelligence was vital.

In the ACW, there was much guerrilla warfare, war atrocities, massacres, a variety of war crimes which included blockader running. Plus places like Andersonville (in Georgia- with famous photographs akin to Bergen-Belsen). Hanging was common, a norm.

Besides the well published lists of barb-wire, first battle between ironclads, the machine gun etc. There were other firsts, e.g. Mary Surratt – was hanged by the neck at Fort McNair in Washington D.C. (photos not by Matthew Brady, but by Scottish photographer Alexander Gardner ). [Bradford Central Library had a full collection].
It also had use of properly organised spy services, like the Union Intelligence Service with Pinkerton. Lady spies with the likes of Sarah Emma Edmonds, Belle Boyd etc.

UK audiences will be probably be only familiar with the Hollywood’s “Gone with the Wind”. Involving Sherman marching through Georgia, with scorched-earth economic warfare. The film involves Naval Captain Rhett Butler being in jail for being a blockader runner. Or, Buster Keaton in the General (1926) based on true stories of foiling Union Agents in 1862– an immensely popular film, one of the greatest hits, in the Southern States.

Room for much more research. Did Morphy get that job?
.

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Gerard Killoran
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Re: Chess history trivia

Postby Gerard Killoran » Wed Dec 14, 2016 5:34 pm

Here's a chess riddle.

When was Black White and White Black?

Ian Thompson
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Re: Chess history trivia

Postby Ian Thompson » Wed Dec 14, 2016 6:25 pm

Gerard Killoran wrote:Here's a chess riddle.

When was Black White and White Black?

On 21 March 1998 and 24 May 2003 according to my database, assuming you mean both criteria have to be satisfied at the same time.

... and if we're allowed to translate White and Black into foreign languages then on at least 4 more occasions between 1880 and 1890.

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Gerard Killoran
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Re: Chess history trivia

Postby Gerard Killoran » Wed Dec 14, 2016 8:41 pm

I think this could be the first time - in English
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Globe - Saturday 05 December 1914.jpg
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Gerard Killoran
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Re: Chess history trivia

Postby Gerard Killoran » Mon Jan 09, 2017 6:46 pm

Another one.

When was White White and Black Dark?

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Gerard Killoran
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Re: Chess history trivia

Postby Gerard Killoran » Tue Jan 10, 2017 4:39 pm

Here it is...

Shipley Times and Express, 25 December 1914 p.3.jpg
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Gordon Cadden
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Re: Chess history trivia

Postby Gordon Cadden » Wed Jan 11, 2017 6:16 am

John Herbert White was the Secretary of Hampstead Chess Club. He died on November 18, 1920, after an accident on his bicycle.
He produced the first pocket edition of Modern Chess Openings, with fellow Hampstead member, Richard Clewin Griffiths.

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Gerard Killoran
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Re: Chess history trivia

Postby Gerard Killoran » Wed Jan 11, 2017 12:05 pm

There is an account of J. H. White's untimely death here:

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/winter147.html#CN_10139

Gordon Cadden
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Re: Chess history trivia

Postby Gordon Cadden » Wed Jan 11, 2017 4:36 pm

Very familiar with the place where J.H. White died. He would have been cycling down West Heath Road, bearing left into Platts Lane and Hermitage Lane. Either his brakes failed, or he did not allow himself sufficient braking distance before reaching the junction. A truly bizarre death for a renowned theoretician and chess organizer. He had escorted Jose Raul Capablance around the United Kingdom giving simultaneous displays.
Was offered his gold pocket watch about 6 years ago. The price was £900. This watch was presented by the Hampstead Club members, in appreciation of his services to the club.

Gordon Cadden
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Re: Chess history trivia

Postby Gordon Cadden » Wed Jan 11, 2017 4:50 pm

This is the history trivia section, so here are the details of the gold pocket watch. Chronometer Hunter Pocket Watch with Stop-Watch Function. White Enamel Dial with Subsiduary Dials. The Inner Case inscribed as follows; Presented to J.H. White by the members of the Hampstead Chess Club in recognition of 10 years service as Hon. Secretary. January 1919

James Plaskett
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Re: Chess history trivia

Postby James Plaskett » Wed Jan 11, 2017 9:32 pm

Just to put the record straight re references here to my departure from Bedford Modern School: -

I left school a few weeks before my 18th birthday, having been assaulted and attacked by a Physics teacher two weeks before.
He ran up to me as I was dining (I captained that school at THREE different things, by the way) and said that I had ridden my bicycle in a dangerous way that morning and if I did it again he would "Smash your f**king face in!!"
There were many witnesses.
Two weeks later I wrote a false absentee letter to cover a morning´s attendance and was thus told to leave by the Head.
I refrained then from mentioning the assault.
God only knows why I refrained. But I had little enthusiasm nor respect for the place. As you´ll surely understand.
I should, of course, have called in the Police and lawyers.
I showed up years later to report it... and was told that no action would be taken against the criminal. I was aghast and mentioned to the Headmaster (the same guy) taking it to the European Court of Human Rights.
His eyes widened with fear.
I wrote then a long letter to the Head of the Harpur Trust which governs the school.
Following what was described as "a good deal of investigation" - and no refutation of any of my allegations, just a written reference to ´alleged events in 1978´ - I was still told that no action would be taken.
I did actually approach my lawyer in 1996 about it. Nick Davies of Gareth Woodvine sympathised but said that after six years a person´s ability to sue for assault vanish under UK Law. So there was no compensation that I could be receiving for the violation of my rights.

I consequently have retained little respect for the institution nor its officers.
Although there have been several subsequent incidents of their trying to crawl up my arse - one which they now tend to regard as that of a distinguished alumnus...

Kevin Thurlow
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Re: Chess history trivia

Postby Kevin Thurlow » Thu Jan 12, 2017 3:38 pm

"Nick Davies of Gareth Woodvine sympathised but said that after six years a person´s ability to sue for assault vanish under UK Law. So there was no compensation that I could be receiving for the violation of my rights."

But the police could still take action if the assailant were a high-profile figure and the police wanted to get their names in the papers.

James Plaskett
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Re: Chess history trivia

Postby James Plaskett » Fri Jan 13, 2017 9:41 am

Indeed.
But, if the just twisting of the knife to extract compensatory payment is no longer possible, and the matter was not handled, as it ought, at the time, let it all hang, Kevin.

MJMcCready
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Re: Chess history trivia

Postby MJMcCready » Wed Feb 01, 2017 6:21 am

The Head being T. Idris Hussey I take it? Welsh if I remember.


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