Search found 316 matches

by John Townsend
Fri Jan 05, 2018 11:47 am
Forum: Chess History
Topic: Chess history trivia
Replies: 475
Views: 35953

Re: Chess history trivia

Gerard's quotation referred to the dissolution of the London Chess Club after 63 years. The legendary foundation year was 1807, and I expect that is about right, but can it be corroborated from any contemporary evidence? (I know of at least one source from the 1820s which refers to 1807.)
by John Townsend
Thu Jan 04, 2018 7:19 pm
Forum: Chess History
Topic: Chess history trivia
Replies: 475
Views: 35953

Re: Chess history trivia

The London Chess Club packed up in 1870, so I expect that's the answer.

We are answering each other's questions, Gerard!
by John Townsend
Mon Jan 01, 2018 6:17 pm
Forum: Chess History
Topic: Chess history trivia
Replies: 475
Views: 35953

Re: Chess history trivia

Yes, very good, Gerard. The author claimed to identify himself in the introduction, which is in Latin verse, but the solution has caused difficulty. Further details on request, if anyone wants a shot!
by John Townsend
Mon Jan 01, 2018 12:59 pm
Forum: Chess History
Topic: Chess history trivia
Replies: 475
Views: 35953

Re: Chess history trivia

Happy New Year, everyone! May all your research meet with good fortune. My question (below) may be considered a sequel to Christopher Kreuzer's recent theme of the Bonus Socius collection. Which celebrated nineteenth-century player was once the owner of a copy of a famous medieval manuscript collect...
by John Townsend
Mon Nov 20, 2017 12:31 pm
Forum: Chess History
Topic: Chess history trivia
Replies: 475
Views: 35953

Re: Chess history trivia

Yes, Richard. In five minutes! Too easy, I can see.
by John Townsend
Mon Nov 20, 2017 12:12 pm
Forum: Chess History
Topic: Chess history trivia
Replies: 475
Views: 35953

Re: Chess history trivia

Which famous chess player was born during the eighteenth century, died in Poland, and gave his name to a popular opening in the modern game?
by John Townsend
Sun Oct 22, 2017 9:59 am
Forum: Chess History
Topic: Chess history trivia
Replies: 475
Views: 35953

Re: Chess history trivia

John, Edward Winter has a feature article, Chess Grandmasters , which can be seen here: http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/grandmasters.html He cites an entry in the Oxford Companion to Chess which notes that Lewis was described as "our past grand master" in an 1838 newspaper. The newspaper ar...
by John Townsend
Sat Oct 21, 2017 9:58 am
Forum: Chess History
Topic: Chess history trivia
Replies: 475
Views: 35953

Re: Chess history trivia

Right you are, Gerard. Lewis (1787-1870) was a central figure in British chess for a long time. Does anyone know of any books about his life and/or his games?
by John Townsend
Fri Oct 20, 2017 7:39 pm
Forum: Chess History
Topic: Chess history trivia
Replies: 475
Views: 35953

Re: Chess history trivia

It's time for another question.

Which famous British chess player died at 5 Brunswick Villas, St. John's Wood?
by John Townsend
Sun Oct 08, 2017 11:45 am
Forum: Chess History
Topic: Yorkshire Chess History Site
Replies: 22
Views: 3274

Re: Yorkshire Chess History Site

Thank you, Gerard, for bringing this interesting biographical sketch to our attention. The account contains an inconsistency over the name of Wormald's father (which I believe was Samuel). Joseph Foster’s Alumni Oxonienses states that Wormald was the third son of Bryan [Wormald], of Bramham, Yorks.,...
by John Townsend
Wed Jul 26, 2017 9:52 am
Forum: Chess History
Topic: Political "hurly-burly"
Replies: 13
Views: 3606

Re: Political "hurly-burly"

I agree with Brian. What evidence is there that Charles Henry Stanley was born in Brighton? In my 2014 book, Historical notes on some chess players , I cited two sources which gave Middlesex as his native place, in one case specifically Clapton, Middlesex. Whilst that is no guarantee that he was bor...
by John Townsend
Wed May 03, 2017 12:51 pm
Forum: Chess History
Topic: Earliest English Chess Clubs
Replies: 45
Views: 11654

Re: Earliest English Chess Clubs

I searched for "Chess and Manchester" in the catalogues of the British Library and COPAC, but drew a blank in both cases. Assuming that I was searching for the correct title, it seems to be a pretty rare book as far as UK libraries are concerned, but, then, I think UK libraries are poorly stocked wi...
by John Townsend
Sun Apr 30, 2017 10:00 am
Forum: Chess History
Topic: What's in a name?
Replies: 6
Views: 1080

Re: What's in a name?

Of course, dinner was a chargeable extra. The sub was less than it could have been. By comparison, in 1839 it was three guineas per annum at the Westminster Chess Club at 26 Charles Street. At the London Chess Club it was for a long time three guineas (four guineas for the first year including the e...
by John Townsend
Fri Apr 28, 2017 7:47 pm
Forum: Chess History
Topic: What's in a name?
Replies: 6
Views: 1080

Re: What's in a name?

I envy the members of Huttmann's club - but perhaps not their tobacco smoke. It is interesting to see that a house dinner was provided every day at 5 p.m., with refreshments at other times; and a cook was on hand. I have sometimes wondered what eating/drinking facilities were provided when Staunton ...
by John Townsend
Fri Mar 24, 2017 11:23 am
Forum: ECF Matters
Topic: National Chess Library closure
Replies: 169
Views: 16388

Re: National Chess Library closure

An auctioneer could be the most pragmatic answer. He might get some good prices for the better material, while also offering a way of disposing of the lower grade items and duplicates and turning them into some cash. A good choice would be Dominic Winter Auctions, of South Cerney, Gloucestershire, w...