Search found 1733 matches

by Tim Harding
Sat Feb 12, 2011 5:11 pm
Forum: Chess History
Topic: Earliest published games played by women/children
Replies: 2
Views: 1322

Re: Earliest published games played by women/children

The earliest published game by a woman was certainly much earlier than 1858. Possibly the answer to that question is: EITHER (if genuine) Napoleon Bonaparte v Comtesse du Remusat OR a game played in London by a Miss Hook against the automaton “The Turk” in 1820. I incline to believe the latter i...
by Tim Harding
Fri Jan 28, 2011 9:52 pm
Forum: Chess History
Topic: Harold Israel
Replies: 23
Views: 5058

Re: Harold Israel

I don't think the British library is a good option for researching Harold Israel's career. The BL moved all its chess magazines (and many other periodicals) last year to its Boston Spa storage outfit in Yorkshire. To see them you must first obtain a reader pass in person at the St Pancras HQ of the ...
by Tim Harding
Fri Jan 28, 2011 9:37 pm
Forum: Chess History
Topic: London leagues and chess clubs
Replies: 33
Views: 5017

Re: London leagues and chess clubs

Random link on the history of chess in London, which I thought was worth putting here for those who didn't know this history already: http://www.victorianlondon.org/entertainment/dickens-chessclubs.htm Both the Timbs and Dickens guides are quite well known, and they are both incomplete and inaccura...
by Tim Harding
Sun Nov 07, 2010 2:47 pm
Forum: Chess History
Topic: Graves of famous chess players
Replies: 17
Views: 11465

Re: Graves of famous chess players

It was John Keeble of Norwich who first discovered the burial record of Philidor in the 1920s (see the article published in The Times for the bicentenary of his birth). The burial record of St James Piccadilly is in the Westminster archive. It is just a very brief one-line entry with no additional i...
by Tim Harding
Mon Nov 01, 2010 7:17 pm
Forum: Chess History
Topic: New book on the history of correspondence chess
Replies: 0
Views: 611

New book on the history of correspondence chess

This month McFarland & Co. will be publishing my new book, entitled "Correspondence Chess in Britain and Ireland, 1824-1987". It went to the printer last week. This is a deeply-researched history book, partly based on my doctoral thesis and partly on subsequent research. It includes about 200 games ...
by Tim Harding
Tue Oct 26, 2010 11:16 pm
Forum: Chess History
Topic: Champions' Names
Replies: 222
Views: 27808

Re: Champions Names

Bob Clark wrote:1978 - U21, I believe was John Hall - Who was at Leeds university at the time.
Only one I know!
Yes, there was a tie in Ayr. Maybe three players were involved. The late Tom Clarke from belfast was
one of them anyway and they had a playoff later in England, which Hall won.
by Tim Harding
Sat Oct 23, 2010 10:29 pm
Forum: Chess History
Topic: Unknown participants in the tournament London 1851
Replies: 31
Views: 4142

Re: Unknown participants in the tournament London 1851

Hi Mario, I can help you with Samuel Newham. As somebody has mentioned, he was from Nottingham and was considered one of the two or three strongest British players living outside London in the early 1840s. He was a founder member and president of the Bromley House chess club in Nottingham, which was...
by Tim Harding
Sat Oct 23, 2010 10:16 pm
Forum: Chess History
Topic: The first books about individual openings
Replies: 32
Views: 6162

Re: The first books about individual openings

It was originally asked: When did the first books about individual openings, as opposed to general openings guides like MCO, actually start being published? I'm interested in finding out what was the first one: (a) published in the UK (b) published in English, if not the same as (a) (c) published a...