Laws of chess

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Anthony Appleyard
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Joined: Sun Dec 16, 2012 9:18 am

Laws of chess

Post by Anthony Appleyard » Thu Dec 07, 2017 2:50 pm

I have found the current laws of chess, at
http://www.fide.com/fide/handbook.html? ... ew=article

I know that running out of time (i.e. the clock flag falling) causes loss, but the laws do not seem to say all of this clearly all together in one rule. Which rules must be put together to establish the "lost on time" rule?

Similarly, I read a bit ago about a new chess rule that a player loses if his mobile phone (USA: cellphone) rings during play, but I cannot find that expressed literally in the rules.

In Appendix D.2.1, for the file letters ABCDEFGH, how often do players revert to old job-related training and use the NATO code names instead "Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, Delta, Echo, Foxtrot, Golf, Hotel"?

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IM Jack Rudd
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Re: Laws of chess

Post by IM Jack Rudd » Thu Dec 07, 2017 3:06 pm

Anthony Appleyard wrote:
Thu Dec 07, 2017 2:50 pm
I have found the current laws of chess, at
http://www.fide.com/fide/handbook.html? ... ew=article

I know that running out of time (i.e. the clock flag falling) causes loss, but the laws do not seem to say all of this clearly all together in one rule. Which rules must be put together to establish the "lost on time" rule?
Rule 6.9

Kevin Thurlow
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Re: Laws of chess

Post by Kevin Thurlow » Thu Dec 07, 2017 3:15 pm

"11.3.2.1
 
During a game, a player is forbidden to have any electronic device not specifically approved by the arbiter in the playing venue.
However, the regulations of an event may allow such devices to be stored in a player’s bag, provided the device is completely switched off. This bag must be placed as agreed with the arbiter. Both players are forbidden to use this bag without permission of the arbiter.
11.3.2.2
If it is evident that a player has such a device on their person in the playing venue, the player shall lose the game. The opponent shall win. The regulations of an event may specify a different, less severe, penalty."

covers "cellphones". Wording has changed since the first, "if your phone makes a noise you lose" rule.

Blind players use a special alphabet in theory, but I reckon most would recognise the NATO alphabet. Whenever, I have played one, they have accepted "Rook d 3" etc. You are supposed to repeat the move back anyway.

Ian Thompson
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Re: Laws of chess

Post by Ian Thompson » Thu Dec 07, 2017 6:37 pm

Anthony Appleyard wrote:
Thu Dec 07, 2017 2:50 pm
Similarly, I read a bit ago about a new chess rule that a player loses if his mobile phone (USA: cellphone) rings during play, but I cannot find that expressed literally in the rules.
That's because the rules prohibit all electronic devices unless with permission and switched off, not just phones. You don't lose the game, per se, because your phone rings; you lose the game because it ringing proves it wasn't switched off.

Stewart Reuben
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Re: Laws of chess

Post by Stewart Reuben » Thu Dec 07, 2017 10:28 pm

Anthony, the Law used to say 'if your mobile phone rings'. But then it was changed because of what happened in my bedroom. My mobile phone was switched off and had been for a long time. Suddenly it made a sound and a light came on. It was a low battery warning. Thus the change to 'if it makes a sound'. If you have set the alarm with your mobile phone, and switch it off, it may still give the warning at the appropriate time.

ABCDEFGH has the disadvantage when spoken that b, c, d, e, g, can be confused. Thus using them when communicating with blind players or by telephone or radio is difficult. The NATO system is superior for this purpose. There are other systems. e.g. The Udeman Code where a1 becomes 11, b1 12 and b2 22. But these have never caught on in chess. You can. of course, express the alphabet in different languages.

Kevin Thurlow
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Re: Laws of chess

Post by Kevin Thurlow » Fri Dec 08, 2017 2:08 pm

"The Udeman Code where a1 becomes 11, b1 12 and b2 22. But these have never caught on in chess."

It did in correspondence chess and was useful for international events, where 1.e4 e5, 2.Nf3 Sc6, Bc4 Lc5 might have been confusing. 1.5254 5755, 2.7163 2836, 3. 6134 6835 would at least be understandable.

Now it's done online, it's easier.

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