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Offering draws with a blunder or dodgy move

Posted: Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:45 pm
by Roger de Coverly
In today's game in the World teams, Adams accepted a draw offer in a position where his opponent's previous move was an error according to the engines.

I expect we've all done that, particularly in positions where we've been looking to achieve a drawn outcome.

One of my worse ones is accepting a draw as White to move in this position.



Black's last move was Qb3-d5 with a draw offer.

Re: Offering draws with a blunder or dodgy move

Posted: Fri Mar 08, 2019 3:52 pm
by Geoff Chandler
Hi Roger,

(OOPS!)

I have a rule of thumb.

Never resign or accept an offered draw if you have a check in the position.

Re: Offering draws with a blunder or dodgy move

Posted: Fri Mar 08, 2019 4:43 pm
by Phil Makepeace
In deference to the thread-starter, this was my first ever 4NCL game. 36... Nd4 with a draw offer was quite something.


Re: Offering draws with a blunder or dodgy move

Posted: Fri Mar 08, 2019 4:56 pm
by Reg Clucas
I had one with a similar theme. It didn't actually involve a draw offer, though the game was eventually drawn. Particularly annoying as my opponent was a FM, so I missed a good scalp. In this position he played ...Ne5?? to which I replied Qf6??
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Re: Offering draws with a blunder or dodgy move

Posted: Fri Mar 08, 2019 5:06 pm
by Matt Mackenzie
I can see why that happened - easy to miss that after 1....Ne5 2Rd8+ Kg7 the f8 square is no longer covered by Black's R!

Re: Offering draws with a blunder or dodgy move

Posted: Sat Mar 09, 2019 10:45 am
by Kevin Thurlow
It is easy to do though. I offered one opponent a draw and he glared at me and played the winning move. After I resigned, I apologized profusely and said I'd totally missed it! You do get people offering draws where you are material up and/or attacking...

Re: Offering draws with a blunder or dodgy move

Posted: Sat Mar 09, 2019 11:21 am
by Matt Fletcher
I don't have the position but I distinctly remember a game (though I may be slightly mis-remembering some of the exact details) that a county teammate of mine played in the British Championship (probably under 10 / 11). He'd been struggling after a dodgy opening, got back into it slightly in the middlegame and tactically offered a draw despite being somewhat down on material.

While his opponent was considering the offer, my friend realised that he had mate in 3 and started crying. His opponent thought for a bit longer, then played a move and offered the draw back!

So my friend instantly refused, cheered up, and played his mating sequence... I think the result stood, despite his opponent's protestations.

Re: Offering draws with a blunder or dodgy move

Posted: Sat Mar 09, 2019 12:21 pm
by Nick Ivell
The first time I played the late George Ellison, doyen of Fylde chess, I was 12 years old. He was a much stronger player than me at that time. Nevertheless, he ending up in a stone-cold lost same-coloured bishop ending a pawn down. I was coasting to victory.

Then he offered a draw! I found the courage to turn the offer down and close the game out.

What do people think of draw offers in a frankly lost position? My feeling is that it was poor etiquette. George was using his reputation to intimidate a young opponent.

All part of the game I suppose...

Re: Offering draws with a blunder or dodgy move

Posted: Sat Mar 09, 2019 5:24 pm
by Kevin Thurlow
"What do people think of draw offers in a frankly lost position? My feeling is that it was poor etiquette."

Agreed!

Re: Offering draws with a blunder or dodgy move

Posted: Sat Mar 09, 2019 5:51 pm
by Roger de Coverly
Nick Ivell wrote:
Sat Mar 09, 2019 12:21 pm
What do people think of draw offers in a frankly lost position?
If you are playing without increments and your winning opponent is really short of time, it's a way of indicating that you would accept an "unable to win" claim, were the opponent to make one. With increments, you should probably assume the opponent is good enough to play at 10,15 or 30 seconds a move, and not make such an offer.

Re: Offering draws with a blunder or dodgy move

Posted: Sun Mar 10, 2019 2:33 pm
by Stewart Reuben
A 13 or 14 year old offered me a draw when he stood much worse and had no counter-play. His father got quite annoyed with me when I just laughed.

An adult opponent offered me a draw when I stood much better. After I had won, I asked him why he had offered me a draw in such a poor position. He responded, Wel, some of my opponents are stupid.'

Off topic. I was playing in a weekend Swiss. A player resigned. I was the first to reach the board to show him he had a forced mate in 3. The Alice Mate, 1 Ne7+ Kh8 2 Qxh7+ Kxh7 3 Rh4#

Re: Offering draws with a blunder or dodgy move

Posted: Sun Mar 10, 2019 7:33 pm
by Matt Mackenzie
Alice, or Anastasia?

Re: Offering draws with a blunder or dodgy move

Posted: Sun Mar 10, 2019 8:58 pm
by Stewart Reuben
I've forgotten. I first heard of it in French.

Re: Offering draws with a blunder or dodgy move

Posted: Mon Mar 11, 2019 8:12 am
by Kevin Thurlow
Anastasia - I think. I have been trying to get the finish for years in a proper game and finally did it a couple of years ago.

Re: Offering draws with a blunder or dodgy move

Posted: Mon Mar 11, 2019 10:21 pm
by Malcolm Clarke
I have known a player offer a draw when a whole queen down, although I think that in this instance the player was well under 100 playing strength and had not taken stock of the position. This season I have seen a player win a game despite being a queen for a minor piece down

I think a few years ago the game Glenn Lambert v Alexander Kotov was discussed on here, where I believe Lambert offered a draw, Kotov refused and was adamant he was winning whereupon Lambert resigned when it was discovered later he had a winning combination which shows that even strong players can misjudge situations.