(Chess) Life Returning To Normal

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Tim Spanton
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Re: (Chess) Life Returning To Normal

Post by Tim Spanton » Sat Jul 25, 2020 4:28 am

The report from Public Health England is almost 70-pages long, but here is the Executive Summary:

This report provides evidence-based insights on the relationship between
excess weight and COVID-19. Evidence has been brought together from UK and
international studies published during the pandemic. These have been identified
using a pragmatic methodology; the report is not a systematic review. Findings
have been contextualised with information on the prevalence, causes, and risks
of excess weight. Information on food and drink purchases and physical activity
during lockdown is also included.
The prevalence and disease burden resulting from excess weight is a major
international public health concern. Almost two-thirds of adults in England are
living with excess weight for their height (BMI ≥25kg/m2), with similar figures in
Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.
Excess weight affects all population groups but is higher for those people aged
between 55-74 years, people living in deprived areas and in some Black, Asian
and Minority Ethnic (BAME) groups compared with the general population. It is
established that the health risk of excess weight for some BAME groups occur at
a lower BMI than for White populations.
Living with excess weight is a risk factor for a range of chronic diseases,
including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, many cancers, liver and
respiratory disease. Obesity is also associated with reduced life expectancy, and
lower quality of life.
Evidence on the links between weight status and COVID-19 outcomes are
drawn primarily from three sources: retrospective cohort studies, clinical audits
of patients with COVID-19 in hospital and routine primary care records with data
linkage to outcomes. This evidence suggests excess weight is associated with
an increased risk of the following for COVID-19: a positive test, hospitalisation,
advanced levels of treatment (including mechanical ventilation or admission to
intensive or critical care) and death. The risks seem to increase progressively
with increasing BMI above the healthy weight range, even after adjustment for
potential confounding factors, including demographic and socio-economic
factors. There is also some evidence to suggest that disparities in excess weight
may explain some of the observed differences in outcomes linked to COVID-19
for older adults and some BAME groups.
These observations are supported by plausible mechanisms which might explain
the association between obesity and COVID-19 outcomes. These include the
effects of excess adipose tissue on respiratory function, metabolic dysfunction,
the cardiovascular system, enhanced inflammatory response and impaired
response to infection. There may also be an interaction with weight-related
comorbidities, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular and respiratory
diseases, which are also associated with more severe COVID-19. In addition,
socio-economic and demographic factors associated with excess weight, are
also associated with COVID-19 severity. Stigma experienced by people living
with obesity, may delay interaction with health care and may also contribute to
increased risk of severe complications arising from COVID-19.
Rapid emergence of research relating to excess weight and COVID-19 has been
vital in supporting policy and decision makers. However, there remain limitations
with the evidence to date, including unrepresentative sampling, small sample
sizes in many studies or limited numbers of COVID-19 infections. In addition,
BMI has been estimated and not measured in some studies or measured many
years prior to exposure to COVID-19 infection. There is much more to
understand when it comes to obesity and the pathogenesis of COVID-19,
including why some population groups appear to have greater risk.
Nonetheless, despite its limitations, the evidence consistently suggests that
people with COVID-19 who are living with overweight or obesity, compared with
those of a healthy weight, are at an increased risk of serious COVID-19
complications and death. Some of the studies suggest that the association is
attenuated by, but independent of, other important factors including age, sex and
ethnicity. It is also independent of social economic status in studies which
considered this. At this time, however, conclusions on excess weight and
COVID-19 severity are tentative and more research is needed to build the
evidence base.
It is currently unclear to what extent the relatively high prevalence of excess
weight seen in the UK, compared with other countries, may have contributed to
the severity of COVID-19 in the UK. In addition, it is uncertain to what extent
differences in the prevalence of excess weight for different population groups
(including for different ethnic groups and those living in deprived areas), have
contributed to inequalities in outcomes. However, these inequalities, related to
obesity, appear to be key factors in the risk of COVID-19.
For groups living with obesity, weight loss has been shown to bring long-term
health benefits. There is currently no high-quality research on the effects of
weight loss on COVID-19 risks, however, based on the potential mechanisms
underpinning the associations, the role of excess weight as a risk factor for
serious COVID-19 complications warrants further consideration.
Factors, such as age and ethnicity cannot be changed and factors such as
deprivation, are complex to address. Supporting people who are overweight or
living with obesity to lose weight, together with interventions to prevent or slow
weight gain across the population will plausibly reduce future population risks of
COVID-19. Moreover, there is robust evidence these interventions will bring
wider health benefits to individuals and reduce pressures on the NHS due to
overweight and obesity.
There is no single solution to tackling obesity. Actions will be required to both
prevent excess weight gain and support people who are living with overweight or
obesity to move towards a healthier weight. Drivers of excess calorie intakes
and low levels of physical activity, within the environment people live, will need
to change at a national and local level to support population-level weight
change. Improving and increasing access to weight management options for the
large numbers of people who could benefit, and which are tailored to individual
needs and preferences would also help address levels of obesity.
The COVID-19 pandemic has brought the health crisis caused by overweight
and obesity to the fore. The case for action at scale and over the long term to
prevent excess weight and support people living with obesity is strong. Doing
more for those groups most affected can help improve health overall and help
address some of the inequalities in health.

Tim Spanton
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Re: (Chess) Life Returning To Normal

Post by Tim Spanton » Sat Jul 25, 2020 4:30 am

And here is a comment I was sent from the British Heart Foundation.

Jacob West, Executive Director of Healthcare Innovation at the BHF, said:

“The coronavirus pandemic has thrown into sharp relief what we knew already, that obesity is a public health crisis that must be addressed urgently.

“As this stark new report confirms, people with obesity are disproportionately at risk of worse outcomes from Covid-19, while also being at greater risk of developing other serious, life-threatening medical conditions, such as heart and circulatory diseases.

“There is no silver bullet for addressing this complex issue, and it’s clear that reducing obesity levels in the UK cannot just be about exercise and personal willpower. Without creating a healthier environment for everyone to live in, we won’t see the meaningful changes needed to truly save and improve lives far into the future.

“Early reports that the Prime Minister will announce measures to curb junk food marketing as part of an obesity strategy are an encouraging sign that the Government is primed to take ambitious action. It is now vital that any plans swiftly become reality, and we look forward to seeing the details next week.”

Kevin Thurlow
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Re: (Chess) Life Returning To Normal

Post by Kevin Thurlow » Sat Jul 25, 2020 9:35 am

Thanks Tim, very useful.

NickFaulks
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Re: (Chess) Life Returning To Normal

Post by NickFaulks » Sat Jul 25, 2020 10:55 am

Good examples of "put up a smokescreen" and "never waste a crisis".
If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face — forever.

Paul Cooksey
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Re: (Chess) Life Returning To Normal

Post by Paul Cooksey » Sat Jul 25, 2020 11:13 am

The line between non-chess and chess related real world events hard to manage at the moment. But I don't see the obesity strategy as having direct bearing on chess. Unless the ECF introduces a BMI <25 rule, in which case I am in more trouble than most.

Kevin Thurlow
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Re: (Chess) Life Returning To Normal

Post by Kevin Thurlow » Sat Jul 25, 2020 11:32 am

"But I don't see the obesity strategy as having direct bearing on chess. Unless the ECF introduces a BMI <25 rule, in which case I am in more trouble than most."

It might improve playing conditions in cramped tournament halls?

Tim Spanton
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Re: (Chess) Life Returning To Normal

Post by Tim Spanton » Sat Jul 25, 2020 4:46 pm

It somewhat reminds me of when Ryanair claimed to be considering imposing a fat tax on their heavier passengers - a publicity stunt, presumably, but it had the desired effect of producing headlines (eg if you Google [ryanair weighing passengers] the first piece that comes up is from theguardian.com)

Tim Spanton
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Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:35 am

Re: (Chess) Life Returning To Normal

Post by Tim Spanton » Sat Jul 25, 2020 4:54 pm

Tim Spanton wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:05 am
Adam Raoof wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 8:49 am
Is it easier to stay in Europe and keep travelling than to return to the UK and risk being quarantined on the way in/out?
Good question. Unfortunately I am not in a position to keep travelling, and fortunately there is no longer quarantining on returning to the UK (at least not from the places I am likely to be playing in) so I plan to keep flying back and forth.
However I may inquire about getting a Covid-free certificate as Innsbruck would be good timing for me.
Applied to the CzechTour yesterday re Prague, but have not heard back - meanwhile FO is saying re Austria: "From 27 July 2020 British nationals and EU/ ECA nationals resident in the UK and travelling from the UK will not need to provide a medical certificate or quarantine."

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Adam Raoof
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Re: (Chess) Life Returning To Normal

Post by Adam Raoof » Sat Jul 25, 2020 5:02 pm

What is the experience of flying at the moment? Are there empty seats / to enable social distancing? Lots of bargain flights online, which makes me pause for thought...
Adam Raoof IA, IO
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Wadih Khoury
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Re: (Chess) Life Returning To Normal

Post by Wadih Khoury » Sat Jul 25, 2020 6:07 pm

Adam Raoof wrote:
Sat Jul 25, 2020 5:02 pm
What is the experience of flying at the moment? Are there empty seats / to enable social distancing? Lots of bargain flights online, which makes me pause for thought...
Can't talk about flying, but train is a mixed bag.
Eurostar was fantastic, running at half capacity so lots of social distancing and masks.
French trains were full, though passengers had masks. At least they had WiFi.

Tim Spanton
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Re: (Chess) Life Returning To Normal

Post by Tim Spanton » Sat Jul 25, 2020 8:12 pm

Wadih Khoury wrote:
Sat Jul 25, 2020 6:07 pm
Adam Raoof wrote:
Sat Jul 25, 2020 5:02 pm
What is the experience of flying at the moment? Are there empty seats / to enable social distancing? Lots of bargain flights online, which makes me pause for thought...
Can't talk about flying, but train is a mixed bag.
Eurostar was fantastic, running at half capacity so lots of social distancing and masks.
French trains were full, though passengers had masks. At least they had WiFi.
No social distancing on planes, as far as I know, but compulsory masks.
Here is how I found my trip to Biel:
Heathrow was interesting - I was flying from Terminal 2 with SWISS, and I felt the terminal was reasonably busy, although the fact that Terminal 3 was closed must have helped.
Even so, very few shops were open, and the only place to get a coffee was Leon, which does not serve proper coffee, and anyway had a long queue.
Everyone on the plane and on the trains I got from Zurich - I had to change once - wore a mask.
But walking around Biel this evening I only saw one person wearing a mask, so it is easy to forget there is a health crisis.

Tim Spanton
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Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:35 am

Re: (Chess) Life Returning To Normal

Post by Tim Spanton » Sat Jul 25, 2020 8:14 pm

Tim Spanton wrote:
Sat Jul 25, 2020 8:12 pm
Wadih Khoury wrote:
Sat Jul 25, 2020 6:07 pm
Adam Raoof wrote:
Sat Jul 25, 2020 5:02 pm
What is the experience of flying at the moment? Are there empty seats / to enable social distancing? Lots of bargain flights online, which makes me pause for thought...
Can't talk about flying, but train is a mixed bag.
Eurostar was fantastic, running at half capacity so lots of social distancing and masks.
French trains were full, though passengers had masks. At least they had WiFi.
No social distancing on planes, as far as I know, but compulsory masks.
Here is how I found my trip to Biel:
Heathrow was interesting - I was flying from Terminal 2 with SWISS, and I felt the terminal was reasonably busy, although the fact that Terminal 3 was closed must have helped.
Even so, very few shops were open, and the only place to get a coffee was Leon, which does not serve proper coffee, and anyway had a long queue.
Everyone on the plane and on the trains I got from Zurich - I had to change once - wore a mask.
But walking around Biel this evening I only saw one person wearing a mask, so it is easy to forget there is a health crisis.
I meant to add that in my experience flights are expensive, not cheap, but that may be because I am booking a week or two in advance instead of three months.

Tim Spanton
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Re: (Chess) Life Returning To Normal

Post by Tim Spanton » Tue Jul 28, 2020 11:09 am

There is now a nationality count for Prague, which starts on Aug 8: 263 players from 21 countries: http://chess-results.com/tnr529730.aspx ... ES&flag=30

Ian Thompson
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Re: (Chess) Life Returning To Normal

Post by Ian Thompson » Tue Jul 28, 2020 11:45 am

Anyone who's thinking about playing in Innsbruck at the end of August needs to enter soon.

They are currently showing about 210 entrants, with a limit of 250. There's a €15 surcharge on the entry fee if not paid by 1 August, and I think it said somewhere on their Facebook page that entries close on 3 or 4 August, although I can't now find that.

They're requiring all players to wear visors, that they will provide, during play - https://www.facebook.com/events/4684104 ... 219320045/.

Bruce Baer
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Re: (Chess) Life Returning To Normal

Post by Bruce Baer » Wed Jul 29, 2020 9:30 am

Anyone hearing anything about OTB chess starting in UK ?

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