What are these algebraic notation symbols?

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Anthony Appleyard
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What are these algebraic notation symbols?

Post by Anthony Appleyard » Sat Aug 17, 2013 10:28 pm

I played a game with Fritz 13 in beginner level, and called a full analysis on it (which I let run while I was out), and the analysis printout ends moves with various symbols. What do they mean?

+ (This is check.)
+-
-+
++-
∓
±
± but with two underlines instead of one, i.e. a + above a =

What other such symbols and combinations of symbols are possible?


Clive Blackburn

Re: What are these algebraic notation symbols?

Post by Clive Blackburn » Sat Aug 17, 2013 10:53 pm

Here is another link, giving a comprehensive list of the annotation symbols used in the publication Chess Informant

http://www.angelfire.com/games5/chessod ... tation.htm

Stewart Reuben
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Re: What are these algebraic notation symbols?

Post by Stewart Reuben » Sun Aug 18, 2013 12:07 pm

Richard and Clive have given an excellent reference to some of the symbols. But the ones you asked for are not I think displayed there.
The number of points such as 2 is the equivalent of 2 pawns advantageous. Thus in the standard count Q=9, R=5, B or N=3, P=1; N for P is about +2 and, in the absence of special factors is enough to win.

+- a very substantial advantage for white >2
-+ a very substantial advantage for black > -2. I mean such as-2.2.
++- I have never seen. It must mean an even more substantial advantage for white. Or are 2 symbols muddled? check and a substantial advantage for white.
∓ a definite advantage for black about -0.7
± a definite advantage for white about +0.7
± but with two underlines instead of one, i.e. a + above a = A very small advantage for white, such as that conferred by having the white pieces. about 0.2

The fractions are subjective. Some GMs say, 'I was completely winning' after they lose. On looking at the position, it would seem to me that they had just a small edge, perhaps 0.4. Of course when specified by a computer, they are not subjective - except in the programming.
GM Bent Larsen once said, 'Nobody should resign until all the spectators understand why'.

++ means mate.
(=) means that a draw has been offered.

There is a work in progress for there to be a glossary of words and terms used in The Laws of Chess. When that is complete, I intend to ask whether there is appetite for a dictionary of chess terms.

A Goodall
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Re: What are these algebraic notation symbols?

Post by A Goodall » Sun Aug 18, 2013 7:02 pm

I have seen several definitions of the symbol ++. MCO 11 gives the following definition - "After White's/Black's last move, White/Black has a clear winning advantage." I have also seen it used to indicate mate and double check, with # being used to indicate mate

Ian Kingston
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Re: What are these algebraic notation symbols?

Post by Ian Kingston » Sun Aug 18, 2013 8:31 pm

I would guess that ++- is a check (+) followed by +-.

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Paolo Casaschi
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Re: What are these algebraic notation symbols?

Post by Paolo Casaschi » Sun Aug 18, 2013 10:51 pm

These are the annotation symbols as used by Chess Informant, one of the most authoritative chess publishers:
http://www.chessinformant.rs/system-of-signs/

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