DNA and chess

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PeterTurland
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DNA and chess

Post by PeterTurland » Tue May 06, 2014 9:02 pm

Hello,

I've sort of thought for ages, there is something about chess and human conciousness that connects on a very deep level.

There is a deep connection between chess and DNA, that I don't think has been truly analysed yet.

2^2^2^2 = 64

Robert Stokes
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Re: DNA and chess

Post by Robert Stokes » Tue May 06, 2014 10:25 pm

I don't know why the mathematical statement on the last line is there or what it has to do with chess but I should point out that it is ambiguous as well as incorrect. To be unambiguous it needs brackets because:-

2^(2^(2^2)) = 65536

((2^2)^2)^2 = 256

I don't think there is any way of putting brackets in that makes it give a total of 64.

Neill Cooper
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Re: DNA and chess

Post by Neill Cooper » Tue May 06, 2014 10:54 pm

Perhaps he meant the way that the three base sequence in DNA gives 4^3=64 possible codons, more than enough for the 20 amino acids and the stop codons.

PeterTurland
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Re: DNA and chess

Post by PeterTurland » Wed May 07, 2014 8:39 am

Neill Cooper wrote:Perhaps he meant the way that the three base sequence in DNA gives 4^3=64 possible codons, more than enough for the 20 amino acids and the stop codons.
Yeah you got me Neill. I left school at 15 not realizing I had a brain :)

I'm given to understand the size of the human genome is 3.2Gb, with my limited understanding, this seems to suggest that you could fit our entire genome on a DVD! The compression is mindboggling. Perhaps it's the complexity of chess, with its seeming surface simplicity of only 6 different kinds of piece and 64 squares resonates somehow with the way our minds work. How else can you explain the extraordinary phenomena of a four year old Susan Polgar, beating much older people, except by saying there is something intrinsic about chess and what our neurons get up to?

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