Not pressing the clock

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Michael Farthing
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Re: Not pressing the clock

Post by Michael Farthing » Tue Apr 17, 2018 3:23 pm

I was playing I suppose someone aged 14-15 who 3 moves into a bog standard Sicilian decided to give the position an enormous amount of thought. When I finally pressed my clock he was able to make up his mind very quickly. This not pressing has become a bit of a bad habit I never had in younger days and the same occurred again with the same response. I didn't like that boy.

Finally on the third occasion he took pity on me and pointed out that I hadn't pressed the clock..
Good egg.

Alex Holowczak
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Re: Not pressing the clock

Post by Alex Holowczak » Tue Apr 17, 2018 5:42 pm

Some juniors are taught not to talk to their opponent during a game, or to move until their opponent has pressed the clock to avoid arguments about whose move it is and to slow their moving down. These things are not necessarily unreasonable things to teach juniors independently, but the behaviour quoted is the logical extension of both of them being combined.

NickFaulks
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Re: Not pressing the clock

Post by NickFaulks » Tue Apr 17, 2018 6:41 pm

It seems to me that juniors should be given guidance on this subject. The trouble is, I'm not sure what it should be. Do trainers discuss chess etiquette?

Richard Bates
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Re: Not pressing the clock

Post by Richard Bates » Tue Apr 17, 2018 7:24 pm

From Twitter, I believe Nigel’s main cause for “complaint” was not the it happened, for which he had only himself to blame, but the reaction of his opponent once the flag had fallen. Reference to punching the air and celebrating exuberantly were mentioned. Which would be pretty distasteful behaviour even if having won a brilliancy.

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JustinHorton
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Re: Not pressing the clock

Post by JustinHorton » Tue Apr 17, 2018 7:41 pm

However, his opponent was eleven years old, which is to say of primary school.age.
"Do you play chess?"
"Yes, but I prefer a game with a better chance of cheating."

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NickFaulks
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Re: Not pressing the clock

Post by NickFaulks » Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:02 pm

Richard Bates wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 7:24 pm
Which would be pretty distasteful behaviour even if having won a brilliancy.
I'm not disagreeing, but in football or cricket it would be considered strange not to celebrate in this way. Could this be the definition of "sport" for which we have been searching?

Richard Bates
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Re: Not pressing the clock

Post by Richard Bates » Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:19 pm

NickFaulks wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:02 pm
Richard Bates wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 7:24 pm
Which would be pretty distasteful behaviour even if having won a brilliancy.
I'm not disagreeing, but in football or cricket it would be considered strange not to celebrate in this way. Could this be the definition of "sport" for which we have been searching?
Broadening away from whether a strong 11 year old player can be expected and/or educated to demonstrate reasonable levels of humility in victory, I don't think the comparison is necessarily distinct. Even in triumph most sports would aspire to having showing respect for your opponent within codes of etiquette. It's the line between merely celebrating (usually with team mates and/or fans) and rubbing your opponents nose in defeat.

Alex Holowczak
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Re: Not pressing the clock

Post by Alex Holowczak » Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:37 pm

NickFaulks wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:02 pm
Richard Bates wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 7:24 pm
Which would be pretty distasteful behaviour even if having won a brilliancy.
I'm not disagreeing, but in football or cricket it would be considered strange not to celebrate in this way. Could this be the definition of "sport" for which we have been searching?
It depends though. If you were a bowler and celebrated getting the batsman being out, that would be fine. But if you then use "language or gesture to another player, umpire, team official or spectator that, in the circumstances, is obscene or of a seriously insulting nature", e.g. you give the batsman a send off, it's a Level 2 offence, and there are 5 penalty runs awarded to the batting team.

In the NFL, there are unsportsmanlike conduct penalties for certain celebrations deemed inappropriate; maybe showboating in the endzone, for example.

So there are some limits to what sort of celebrations are permitted and what aren't. I guess the question is where do you draw the line between an acceptable celebration and an unacceptable celebration?

NickFaulks
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Re: Not pressing the clock

Post by NickFaulks » Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:54 pm

Alex Holowczak wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:37 pm
I guess the question is where do you draw the line between an acceptable celebration and an unacceptable celebration?
One obvious distinction is that in chess, during the game, no celebration at all is considered proper - if for instance, your opponent has just left something en prise.

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