HISTORY OF THE LAWS OF CHESS

Historical knowledge and information regarding our great game.
Francis Fields
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Re: HISTORY OF THE LAWS OF CHESS

Post by Francis Fields » Tue Apr 02, 2019 1:47 pm

A tournament player I know said the oldest chess history book was written in the 14th century. He said it mentioned 'some unusual things' so he did not know how reliable it was. One of them was the underpromotion rule which said you could not underpromote if the resulting position was then zugzwang.
"Politics is the enemy of the people who said that?" Samuel Johnson (the playwright not the architect)

Stewart Reuben
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Re: HISTORY OF THE LAWS OF CHESS

Post by Stewart Reuben » Tue Apr 02, 2019 2:15 pm

Francis. >underpromotion rule which said you could not underpromote if the resulting position was then zugzwang.,

That canot be correct. I doubt zugswang was known in the 14th century, With the modern laws, it is difficult to work out a position that would result in zugswang - if a promotion took place to one of four pieces. My knowledge of the old rules is not good enough to work out a zugswang.
More likeely he meant stalemate.
If he can provide access to this 14th century book, that would be a coup.

David Sedgwick
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Re: HISTORY OF THE LAWS OF CHESS

Post by David Sedgwick » Tue Apr 02, 2019 3:49 pm

Stewart Reuben wrote:
Tue Apr 02, 2019 2:15 pm
That cannot be correct.
Indeed it cannot.

Leonard Barden (in another thread) wrote:
Sun Mar 31, 2019 4:37 pm

Francis Fields has form for this type of Forum post.

This is what he wrote in June 2016:

I have heard that the first chess tournament held in England was Oswestry in 1652. The organisers announced it a year in advance so word would spread. The tournament was won by a Mr G Burton a blacksmith from Cheam with 31/31 !!

According to the tournament book people were going up to his opponents and saying 'Are you going for a burton?'


Like his post at the top of this thread, his first tournament in England thread also produced several baffled replies.

There are also a couple of dodgy Francis Field posts in the current thread about the forthcoming Laws book.

Like Nigel Short above, I don't think it is acceptable to use the Forum for historical nonsense disguised as serious posts.

I think this is a case where Carl as chief moderator should take strong action.

Mike Truran
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Re: HISTORY OF THE LAWS OF CHESS

Post by Mike Truran » Tue Apr 02, 2019 4:51 pm

I think it’s called ‘the oxygen of publicity’.

Nick Grey
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Re: HISTORY OF THE LAWS OF CHESS

Post by Nick Grey » Tue Apr 02, 2019 11:31 pm

I thought the oldest chess book was a caxton print 1482 ish? other books to that time too?

Francis Fields
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Re: HISTORY OF THE LAWS OF CHESS

Post by Francis Fields » Thu Apr 04, 2019 11:19 am

Stewart,

I have been looking for the book website I mentioned to Simon but can no longer find it.

Francis Fields
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Re: HISTORY OF THE LAWS OF CHESS

Post by Francis Fields » Thu Apr 04, 2019 11:27 am

I have heard the following about chess notation.

Originally, it was called written chess and there were no move numbers. There was pawn takes pawn and bishop captures knight.

Move numbers were introduced and the notation was called full descriptive e.g. King Bishop pawn forward two.

Then we had descriptive notation. 1. P-K4 etc

The first Fide handbook says that Fide invented algebraic notation. A 19th century chess player claimed that he invented it and that he wanted it introduced. He wrote to other chess players in several European countries.

Leonard Barden
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Re: HISTORY OF THE LAWS OF CHESS

Post by Leonard Barden » Thu Apr 04, 2019 1:03 pm

Francis Fields wrote:
Thu Apr 04, 2019 11:19 am
Stewart,

I have been looking for the book website I mentioned to Simon but can no longer find it.
Like Greenland, Oswestry and now chess notation (see above).....

John McKenna
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Re: HISTORY OF THE LAWS OF CHESS

Post by John McKenna » Thu Apr 04, 2019 3:33 pm

Caxton's Game and Playe of the Chesse (1st Ed. Bruges 1475, 2nd Ed. circa 1481, London) was a translation of an earlier, 13th century work Liber de Moribus Hominum et officiis Nobilum ac Popularium super ludo scacchorum by Jacopo Da Cessole (13th-14th century)

In the 13th cent. John of Waleys (Joh. Gallensis) wrote about chess and what he wrote was included in Summa Collationum that is/was the earliest known printed reference to chess, published circa 1470.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_Wales

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=fVM ... BnoECAkQAQ

[NB: Francis is a teammate but we have had no communication or prior discussion of this topic.]
To find a for(u)m that accommodates the mess, that is the task of the artist now. (Samuel Beckett)

Francis Fields
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Re: HISTORY OF THE LAWS OF CHESS

Post by Francis Fields » Wed May 22, 2019 3:58 pm

Henry Bird a nineteenth century chess player who wrote the Times chess column for many years and played an e3/b3 setup long before Nimzovich or Larsen wrote in his 1893 book that the modern rules date from the 15th century. I have also heard that the 50 move was introduced in 1847.


Previously:

Pawns could only move one square originally but it became two to speed up the game and then en passant was introduced.
The queen and bishop originally moved differently.
Stalemate was originally a win. (I don't know about King v King)
You could only promote to a queen before the underpromotion rule was introduced.
Castling was introduced in the 15th century.
"Politics is the enemy of the people who said that?" Samuel Johnson (the playwright not the architect)

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