Chess history trivia

Historical knowledge and information regarding our great game.
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MJMcCready
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by MJMcCready » Thu May 19, 2016 12:29 am

Yes that is rather annoying,

Hans Renette
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Hans Renette » Thu May 26, 2016 9:08 am

I have the following question/querry:

In 1999 a consultation game Kasparov vs. the World was played. Which master was the first to play against a group of players (i.e. readers of a magazine) according to this principle?

I have a player in mind, but it may be well possible that someone comes up with an earlier occurence of such a game.

Roger de Coverly
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Roger de Coverly » Thu May 26, 2016 9:16 am

Hans Renette wrote: Which master was the first to play against a group of players (i.e. readers of a magazine) according to this principle?
Without knowing the answer, I might speculate that it goes back as far as the era of Staunton. Earlier than that, postal systems had yet to be invented, or for that matter railways which enable post to be delivered without much delay.

Tim Harding
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Tim Harding » Fri May 27, 2016 11:48 am

Hans Renette wrote:I have the following question/querry:

In 1999 a consultation game Kasparov vs. the World was played. Which master was the first to play against a group of players (i.e. readers of a magazine) according to this principle?

I have a player in mind, but it may be well possible that someone comes up with an earlier occurrence of such a game.
One problem with such games is whether the master's opponent had a moderator who chose the replies from among readers' suggestions, or whether the reply was selected by majority vote.
In the latter case the master was very likely to win as he only had to set some plausible traps. In moderated games (like the BBC Third Programme's Master v Listeners games, in the 1960s) it was tougher for the master as the moderator was effectively the opponent.

For example the game DDR TV Viewers v Tigran Petrosian, 1970-71, won by the former. The East German public made suggestions and every week a move was made but in reality Horst Rittner (6th correspondence world champion) effectively played the game himself. Source: Fritz Baumbach's book, "52-54 Stop," page 147.
Tim Harding
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Author of 'Steinitz in London,' British Chess Literature to 1914', 'Joseph Henry Blackburne: A Chess Biography', and 'Eminent Victorian Chess Players'
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Hans Renette
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Hans Renette » Sun May 29, 2016 1:03 pm

In March 1898 Bird began two games against the readers of a London magazine, Pearson's Weekly. To make the games attractive he opened twice with the King's Gambit. After 11 moves both games were silently stopped.

John Townsend
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by John Townsend » Sun May 29, 2016 2:16 pm

Further to Roger's suggestion, Staunton played some members of the Bristol Chess Club by correspondence in 1840, but no magazine was involved.

John Townsend
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by John Townsend » Sun May 29, 2016 2:52 pm

Another question.

In which fictional game of chess did Apollo lose with White?

Nick Grey
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Nick Grey » Sun May 29, 2016 3:14 pm

Scacchia Ludus ("The Game of Chess").

John Townsend
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by John Townsend » Sun May 29, 2016 4:48 pm

Yes, well done, Nick.

Tim Harding
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Tim Harding » Tue May 31, 2016 11:27 am

Next puzzle, sorry if it's too hard. Identify the writer and source of a poem about chess beginning:

Arms, and the Game I sing, whose varied maze
The subtle arts of warring hosts displays;
O'er which nor Jove nor Juno's self presides,
Nor chance directs, nor erring Fortune guides –
But skill alone the pensive strife decides!
Tim Harding
Historian and FIDE Arbiter

Author of 'Steinitz in London,' British Chess Literature to 1914', 'Joseph Henry Blackburne: A Chess Biography', and 'Eminent Victorian Chess Players'
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Barry Sandercock
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Barry Sandercock » Tue May 31, 2016 4:12 pm

That is a hard one. Could it be by a chess player, named M.Slous ?

Tim Harding
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Tim Harding » Tue May 31, 2016 11:04 pm

Barry Sandercock wrote:That is a hard one. Could it be by a chess player, named M.Slous ?
Getting warm; that is an alternative spelling of the poet's surname (the one usually seen in chess sources but not on the the book)

but M is not the right initial.
Tim Harding
Historian and FIDE Arbiter

Author of 'Steinitz in London,' British Chess Literature to 1914', 'Joseph Henry Blackburne: A Chess Biography', and 'Eminent Victorian Chess Players'
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Barry Sandercock
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Barry Sandercock » Wed Jun 01, 2016 12:26 pm

How about F.L.Slous alias Selous.

Tim Harding
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Tim Harding » Wed Jun 01, 2016 2:12 pm

Barry Sandercock wrote:How about F.L.Slous alias Selous.
Yes, Frederick Lokes Selous [aka Slous], father of a famous big game hunter who is in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.
Strong player in the 1830s and occasionally active thereafter. One of those who, some claimed, could (like Buckle) have rivalled Staunton had he been bothered.

Now supplying the source should be easy...
Tim Harding
Historian and FIDE Arbiter

Author of 'Steinitz in London,' British Chess Literature to 1914', 'Joseph Henry Blackburne: A Chess Biography', and 'Eminent Victorian Chess Players'
http://www.chessmail.com

Mike Truran
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Mike Truran » Wed Jun 01, 2016 6:02 pm

"The Chess Player's Chronicle" Volume 5 1845 (pp. 274-278).

Republished from "Leaves from the Scrapbook of an Awkward Man" (1844).

Apparently "first published as a waistcoat-pocket pamphlet...... some ten or a dozen years back".

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