Chess history trivia

Historical knowledge and information regarding our great game.
John Townsend
Posts: 296
Joined: Sun Aug 29, 2010 8:26 pm

Re: Chess history trivia

Post by John Townsend » Mon Jan 01, 2018 6:17 pm

Yes, very good, Gerard. The author claimed to identify himself in the introduction, which is in Latin verse, but the solution has caused difficulty. Further details on request, if anyone wants a shot!

MJMcCready
Posts: 1205
Joined: Mon Jun 24, 2013 2:30 pm

Re: Chess history trivia

Post by MJMcCready » Mon Jan 01, 2018 11:24 pm

Gerard Killoran wrote:
Mon Jan 01, 2018 10:43 am
MJMcCready wrote:
Sat Dec 30, 2017 12:16 pm
Who came up with this oddity? It's mate in 21 and not too hard.
Thomas Rayner Dawson
It was indeed.

User avatar
Gerard Killoran
Posts: 343
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2009 11:51 am
Contact:

Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Gerard Killoran » Thu Jan 04, 2018 6:50 pm

Which year was this written?
Is chess on the wane? It would seem so from the fact that the London Chess Club, after an existence of sixty-three years, has just been dissolved. Perhaps we are too fast now-a-days for so slow, thoughtful, and absorbing a game. Whether chess is or is not declining, it is certain that billiards is becoming every day a more popular game. The marvellous play of the present champion (who lately made 512 in a break, the largest break on record) has drawn attention to the game, and this may partly account for its increasing popularity.

John Townsend
Posts: 296
Joined: Sun Aug 29, 2010 8:26 pm

Re: Chess history trivia

Post by John Townsend » Thu Jan 04, 2018 7:19 pm

The London Chess Club packed up in 1870, so I expect that's the answer.

We are answering each other's questions, Gerard!

User avatar
Gerard Killoran
Posts: 343
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2009 11:51 am
Contact:

Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Gerard Killoran » Thu Jan 04, 2018 9:06 pm

Chess has been on the wane for nearly 150 years!

NickFaulks
Posts: 4052
Joined: Sat Jan 02, 2010 1:28 pm

Re: Chess history trivia

Post by NickFaulks » Fri Jan 05, 2018 12:10 am

Gerard Killoran wrote:
Thu Jan 04, 2018 6:50 pm
The marvellous play of the present champion (who lately made 512 in a break, the largest break on record) has drawn attention to the game, and this may partly account for its increasing popularity.
Whatever you think of the current state of elite chess, it must be better than watching someone making a 512 break at billiards.

MJMcCready
Posts: 1205
Joined: Mon Jun 24, 2013 2:30 pm

Re: Chess history trivia

Post by MJMcCready » Fri Jan 05, 2018 10:21 am

You think so? At least in billiards they make a genuine effort to try and win rather than play out a dull draw for hours on end.

John Townsend
Posts: 296
Joined: Sun Aug 29, 2010 8:26 pm

Re: Chess history trivia

Post by John Townsend » Fri Jan 05, 2018 11:47 am

Gerard's quotation referred to the dissolution of the London Chess Club after 63 years. The legendary foundation year was 1807, and I expect that is about right, but can it be corroborated from any contemporary evidence? (I know of at least one source from the 1820s which refers to 1807.)

Kevin Thurlow
Posts: 2319
Joined: Wed Apr 30, 2008 12:28 pm

Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Kevin Thurlow » Fri Jan 05, 2018 12:16 pm

"Whatever you think of the current state of elite chess, it must be better than watching someone making a 512 break at billiards."

Later breaks got over 4000, before they changed the rules! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwKXxmBssPc shows why at about the 3-minute mark.

Gerard and John are very knowledgeable...

MJMcCready
Posts: 1205
Joined: Mon Jun 24, 2013 2:30 pm

Re: Chess history trivia

Post by MJMcCready » Sat Jan 06, 2018 12:55 pm

Which well-known author came up with this puzzle in the 1930s.
555.png
555.png (9.6 KiB) Viewed 485 times
Of the many legal moves that White might just have made, only one can be revised to yield an immediate mate. Can you find it?

User avatar
IM Jack Rudd
Posts: 3634
Joined: Tue Apr 17, 2007 1:13 am
Location: Bideford

Re: Chess history trivia

Post by IM Jack Rudd » Sat Jan 06, 2018 1:28 pm

d7xNc8=R can be revised to d7xRe8=N.

NickFaulks
Posts: 4052
Joined: Sat Jan 02, 2010 1:28 pm

Re: Chess history trivia

Post by NickFaulks » Sat Jan 06, 2018 1:43 pm

MJMcCready wrote:
Sat Jan 06, 2018 12:55 pm
Which well-known author came up with this puzzle in the 1930s.
Vladimir Nabokov?

User avatar
Gerard Killoran
Posts: 343
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2009 11:51 am
Contact:

Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Gerard Killoran » Sat Jan 06, 2018 3:35 pm

IM Jack Rudd wrote:
Sat Jan 06, 2018 1:28 pm
d7xNc8=R can be revised to d7xRe8=N.
Why pawn on d7 and not b7?

MJMcCready
Posts: 1205
Joined: Mon Jun 24, 2013 2:30 pm

Re: Chess history trivia

Post by MJMcCready » Sat Jan 06, 2018 3:47 pm

NickFaulks wrote:
Sat Jan 06, 2018 1:43 pm
MJMcCready wrote:
Sat Jan 06, 2018 12:55 pm
Which well-known author came up with this puzzle in the 1930s.
Vladimir Nabokov?
Yes that's correct.

User avatar
IM Jack Rudd
Posts: 3634
Joined: Tue Apr 17, 2007 1:13 am
Location: Bideford

Re: Chess history trivia

Post by IM Jack Rudd » Sat Jan 06, 2018 7:14 pm

Gerard Killoran wrote:
Sat Jan 06, 2018 3:35 pm
IM Jack Rudd wrote:
Sat Jan 06, 2018 1:28 pm
d7xNc8=R can be revised to d7xRe8=N.
Why pawn on d7 and not b7?
Because it needs to be able to capture the e8 rook.

Post Reply