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Re: Chess history trivia

Posted: Fri Mar 02, 2018 1:37 pm
by Angus French
My Google search produced a different answer(?) to David's: Richard Doddridge Blackmore who, likewise, is previously unheard of to me - though I'm not a student of chess history.

Re: Chess history trivia

Posted: Fri Mar 02, 2018 1:39 pm
by Richard James
John Townsend wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 10:45 am
Which famous chess player was called to the Bar on 7 June 1852?
If we're thinking about the same person, I paid a small tribute to him the Monday before last. I took a slight detour on my way home from school to walk along a road bearing his name.

Re: Chess history trivia

Posted: Fri Mar 02, 2018 1:47 pm
by Richard James
Angus French wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 1:37 pm
My Google search produced a different answer(?) to David's: Richard Doddridge Blackmore who, likewise, is previously unheard of to me - though I'm not a student of chess history.
That was my answer as well. There was an excellent article about him in CHESS a couple of months ago. He was a pretty decent player.

Wikipedia is good on his writing and rather unsuccessful attempt at market gardening, but doesn't mention his chess career.

If you visited Richmond & Twickenham Chess Club's former venue in Teddington, that was where he lived. I note that, like my grandmother, he's buried in Teddington Cemetery.

Re: Chess history trivia

Posted: Fri Mar 02, 2018 2:59 pm
by John Townsend
Help! Another one on 7 June 1852! But was Blackmore really a famous chess player, or was chess, rather, a life-long hobby?

Any more candidates?

I'm still waiting for the answer I had in mind ...

Re: Chess history trivia

Posted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 10:25 am
by John Townsend
My intended answer was Thomas Wilson Barnes, who for a time was regarded as one of the strongest players in England. In 1858 he won casual games against Paul Morphy. An interesting obituary appeared in Westminster Papers, 1 September 1874.

I am amazed that of about ten people called to the Bar on 7 June 1852, three have so far been identified as keen chess players. What does it say about barristers and chess in general? I mentioned briefly chess at the Middle Temple in my article about Joseph Brown in Chess Notes, C.N. 9909:

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/winter142.html

John Cochrane was at the Inner Temple.

Re: Chess history trivia

Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2018 5:02 pm
by Tim Harding
John Townsend wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 2:59 pm
Help! Another one on 7 June 1852! But was Blackmore really a famous chess player, or was chess, rather, a life-long hobby?

Any more candidates?

I'm still waiting for the answer I had in mind ...
On Blackmore, not a chess player of note but famous in his day as the author of "Lorna Doone", see pages 176 and 180 of my Eminent Victorian Chess Players. There is more on him in my PhD thesis which is now available online.
Blackmore was friendly with Steinitz, who dedicated his booklet on the 1876 Blackburne match to Blackmore.

Blackmore had qualified as a barrister but never practised, if I recall correctly.
Because of medical advice that he should adopt an outdoor occupation, he took up horticulture.

Re: Chess history trivia

Posted: Tue Mar 06, 2018 5:40 pm
by MJMcCready
Tim Harding wrote:
Mon Mar 05, 2018 5:02 pm
John Townsend wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 2:59 pm
Help! Another one on 7 June 1852! But was Blackmore really a famous chess player, or was chess, rather, a life-long hobby?

Any more candidates?

I'm still waiting for the answer I had in mind ...
On Blackmore, not a chess player of note but famous in his day as the author of "Lorna Doone", see pages 176 and 180 of my Eminent Victorian Chess Players. There is more on him in my PhD thesis which is now available online.
Blackmore was friendly with Steinitz, who dedicated his booklet on the 1876 Blackburne match to Blackmore.

Blackmore had qualified as a barrister but never practised, if I recall correctly.
Because of medical advice that he should adopt an outdoor occupation, he took up horticulture.
Where may we find your thesis on-line Tim? I had a look at your personal site and didn't see it there.

Re: Chess history trivia

Posted: Tue Mar 06, 2018 5:49 pm
by Christopher Kreuzer
MJMcCready wrote:
Tue Mar 06, 2018 5:40 pm
Tim Harding wrote:
Mon Mar 05, 2018 5:02 pm

On Blackmore, not a chess player of note but famous in his day as the author of "Lorna Doone", see pages 176 and 180 of my Eminent Victorian Chess Players. There is more on him in my PhD thesis which is now available online.
Where may we find your thesis on-line Tim? I had a look at your personal site and didn't see it there.
Try here?

‘Battle at long range’: correspondence chess in Britain and Ireland, 1824-1914, a social and cultural history

749 pages.

Re: Chess history trivia

Posted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 10:27 pm
by MJMcCready
Thank you very much. So I get to read chess history with an explained methodology, written by a[n] historian, that does make for a very pleasant change.

Re: Chess history trivia

Posted: Sun Mar 10, 2019 2:36 pm
by John Townsend
Another question.

Which international chess tournament was postponed for a few days because of the funeral of a British monarch?

Re: Chess history trivia

Posted: Sun Mar 10, 2019 3:20 pm
by Leonard Barden
Monte Carlo 1901. Did Blackburne, as the only English participant in the tournament, actually attend Victoria's funeral? I suspect not, since the funeral was on 2 February and the tournament was only postponed from the 1st to the 4th.

Re: Chess history trivia

Posted: Sun Mar 10, 2019 3:30 pm
by John Townsend
Yes, correct, Leonard, and well done. I don't know whether Blackburne went to the funeral. Perhaps Tim Harding will know.

Re: Chess history trivia

Posted: Sun Mar 10, 2019 4:29 pm
by NickFaulks
Leonard Barden wrote:
Sun Mar 10, 2019 3:20 pm
Monte Carlo 1901.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Car ... ament#1901

For some reason I looked this up, and was fascinated by the scoring system. It was repeated the following year, then discontinued.

Can any of our historians tell me whether it was tried elsewhere? This is of interest because related ideas are being proposed nowadays as anti-draw devices.

Re: Chess history trivia

Posted: Sun Mar 10, 2019 9:07 pm
by Nick Grey
Perhaps drawn games replayed because the tournament was in Monte Carlo. Beats turn of a card or spin of the wheel.
Maybe something to bring into league chess?

Re: Chess history trivia

Posted: Mon Mar 11, 2019 5:41 am
by Alex McFarlane
NickFaulks wrote:
Sun Mar 10, 2019 4:29 pm
Can any of our historians tell me whether it was tried elsewhere?
Not sure if I qualify, but the Rules were based on those of Paris 1900, which indeed used the same points system.