Chess history trivia

Historical knowledge and information regarding our great game.
Alex McFarlane
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Alex McFarlane » Wed Jul 15, 2020 5:18 pm

It is indeed Andrew Bonar Law. Always a good Pointless Answer.

Prime Minister not born in this country, etc.

He signed the Treaty of Versailles along with David Lloyd George, James Balfour, Woodrow Wilson.

Long time President of Glasgow Chess Club. Short term President of the Scottish Chess Association (the Scottish was organised by a club and a member of that Club was President for the year leading up to the Championship.

Kevin Thurlow
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Kevin Thurlow » Wed Jul 15, 2020 7:43 pm

"Andrew Bonar Law"

Aaargh - I really should have got that. To add something to the discussion, his second name ("Bonar") rhymes with "honour", or "Honor" (for Avengers fans). Everyone seems to assume it's a long "o".

Alex McFarlane
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Alex McFarlane » Wed Jul 15, 2020 8:02 pm

Kevin Thurlow wrote:
Wed Jul 15, 2020 7:43 pm
Everyone seems to assume it's a long "o".
Not north of the border we don't.

But we are used to weird English variations of simple words.

Greenock being pronounced Gre-nock is bad enough but Bearsden (the den of a bear) being mangled to Beers din is horrendous.

I forgive people getting Milngavie wrong (Mill guy).

I once was driving through Cardonald (Car - donald) when the BBC announced that the M8 motorway was blocked at somewhere called Kardon-aaald. It took a good few seconds to realise I was there!!

Kevin Thurlow
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Kevin Thurlow » Wed Jul 15, 2020 9:50 pm

Yes - sorry, I was thinking of London Civil Service meetings where there was talk of the (rather splendid) Bonar Law Trophy. As soon as I found out, I corrected everyone.

Does Penicuik have a chess club?

David Sedgwick
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by David Sedgwick » Wed Jul 15, 2020 10:22 pm

Alex McFarlane wrote:
Wed Jul 15, 2020 8:02 pm
Not north of the border we don't.

But we are used to weird English variations of simple words.

Greenock being pronounced Gre-nock is bad enough but Bearsden (the den of a bear) being mangled to Beers din is horrendous.

I forgive people getting Milngavie wrong (Mill guy).

I once was driving through Cardonald (Car - donald) when the BBC announced that the M8 motorway was blocked at somewhere called Kardon-aaald. It took a good few seconds to realise I was there!!
I think that those of us south of the border can be forgiven for not knowing that the surname of Jackson Carlaw, the leader of the Scottish Conservative Party, is pronounced "Car - crash".

Or is that just an Andy Howie speciality?
Last edited by David Sedgwick on Wed Jul 15, 2020 10:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Alex McFarlane
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Alex McFarlane » Wed Jul 15, 2020 10:27 pm

David - I'm not getting involved in politics again!!

Kevin - Penny Cook does indeed have a club, but they called it Pentland Hills so that visitors can find it!!

John Townsend
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by John Townsend » Mon Jul 20, 2020 10:37 am

Which parish challenged the whole of England, excluding London, to a match at chess (21 boards) and archery (500 shots) for a maximum stake of £52 10s.?

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MJMcCready
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by MJMcCready » Tue Jul 21, 2020 6:14 am

Was it Milton Keynes parish?

John Townsend
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by John Townsend » Tue Jul 21, 2020 10:02 am

No, that's not the answer.

Kevin Thurlow
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Kevin Thurlow » Tue Jul 21, 2020 10:39 am

"Which parish challenged the whole of England, excluding London, to a match at chess (21 boards) and archery (500 shots) for a maximum stake of £52 10s.?"

As that's 50 guineas, I suspect it's some time ago (although people do use guineas just to sound good). I still have no idea, but I want it to be near Sherwood Forest.

John Townsend
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by John Townsend » Tue Jul 21, 2020 11:25 am

Kevin, if you want it to be near Sherwood Forest, you will be very disappointed! Think Charles I. Think donkey.

Paul Cooksey
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Paul Cooksey » Tue Jul 21, 2020 12:35 pm

I know the IOW has an archery tradition, but I could not name one IOW chess player!

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MJMcCready
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by MJMcCready » Tue Jul 21, 2020 1:13 pm

Could it be Canary Wharf Parish?

Richard James
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by Richard James » Tue Jul 21, 2020 1:26 pm

John Townsend wrote:
Tue Jul 21, 2020 11:25 am
Kevin, if you want it to be near Sherwood Forest, you will be very disappointed! Think Charles I. Think donkey.
Then it must be Carisbrooke (remembered from summer holidays on the IOW).

John Townsend
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Re: Chess history trivia

Post by John Townsend » Tue Jul 21, 2020 2:26 pm

Yes, Carisbrooke it is. Well done, Richard.

The challenge was noted in various newspapers, including Bell's Life in London, 16 August 1835. It can be viewed on-line at the excellent Chess Archaeology website. George Walker seems not to have been impressed with the challenge, which was instigated by Lieutenant Harry Wilson, since he added the following:
This sort of thing is too vague to mean earnest, and worthy rather of the great Captain Bobadil than a Chess-player. The affectation of associating sports so opposite as Chess and Archery is something like challenging Oxford University to write a hundred Greek hexameters, and afterwards to recite them standing upon the head instead of the heels.

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