The English Language

A section to discuss matters not related to Chess in particular.
soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Mon Mar 12, 2018 8:02 pm

What's the difference between 'storied' and 'famous'?

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Mon Mar 12, 2018 8:38 pm

What does the underlined 'does' mean?
Don't allow a passed pawn to get blocked. If your opponent does manage to block it, do everything in your power to remove the blockader.

MartinCarpenter
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Re: The English Language

Post by MartinCarpenter » Mon Mar 12, 2018 9:17 pm

Nothing and essentially nothing - its really just adding an s to manage in a slightly fancier way.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Tue Mar 13, 2018 4:53 am

Shouldn't the author use the verb 'blockade' instead of 'block''?

Roger de Coverly
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Re: The English Language

Post by Roger de Coverly » Tue Mar 13, 2018 9:22 am

soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Tue Mar 13, 2018 4:53 am
Shouldn't the author use the verb 'blockade' instead of 'block''?
Same or equivalent meaning and avoids using "blockade" and "blockader" in the same sentence.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Tue Mar 13, 2018 12:18 pm

What does it mean if a line "wins the house"?

Roger de Coverly
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Re: The English Language

Post by Roger de Coverly » Tue Mar 13, 2018 2:08 pm

soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Tue Mar 13, 2018 12:18 pm
What does it mean if a line "wins the house"?
It's an idiom meaning total victory or equivalent. Derived from gambling probably.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Mon Mar 19, 2018 7:33 pm

What's the difference between
White bacjs up the d-pawn
and
White covers the d-pawn
?

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Tue Mar 20, 2018 3:34 pm

What does it mean that an advancing pawn can "work for" its own promotion?

Barry Sandercock
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Re: The English Language

Post by Barry Sandercock » Wed Mar 21, 2018 3:27 pm

Soheil Hooshdaran wrote:
What's the difference between
White backs up the d- pawn and White covers the d -pawn.

No real difference.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Wed Mar 21, 2018 7:23 pm

Thanks.
And what about my March 20 post?

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Fri Mar 23, 2018 10:34 am

What's the difference between 'critical squares' and 'vital squares'?

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IM Jack Rudd
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Re: The English Language

Post by IM Jack Rudd » Fri Mar 23, 2018 1:20 pm

"Critical square" has a specific meaning in the field of chess composition, referring to a square that a rook/bishop/queen needs to cross to be able to defend a square on the same side of that square. I don't know if that's the context you're looking at.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Sat Mar 24, 2018 1:52 pm

IM Jack Rudd wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 1:20 pm
"Critical square" has a specific meaning in the field of chess composition, referring to a square that a rook/bishop/queen needs to cross to be able to defend a square on the same side of that square. I don't know if that's the context you're looking at.
[...], pawns also keep enemy pieces out of critical squares.

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IM Jack Rudd
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Re: The English Language

Post by IM Jack Rudd » Sat Mar 24, 2018 1:53 pm

In which case, no, it's not the technical term, and so your two phrases would be essentially equivalent.

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