The English Language

A section to discuss matters not related to Chess in particular.
soheil_hooshdaran
Posts: 2499
Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:24 pm

Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Tue Oct 09, 2018 7:26 pm

What does the comment
also forced
mean?
Thanks in advance

soheil_hooshdaran
Posts: 2499
Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:24 pm

Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Thu Oct 11, 2018 4:30 am

"Plan B is OK" means "Plan B is is problem-free"?

soheil_hooshdaran
Posts: 2499
Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:24 pm

Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Thu Oct 11, 2018 9:00 pm

The author wrote
All these plans are at least quite good for Black,
but some are better than others !
What does 'quite good' mean?

User avatar
Michael Farthing
Posts: 1663
Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2014 1:28 pm
Location: Morecambe, Europe

Re: The English Language

Post by Michael Farthing » Thu Oct 11, 2018 9:21 pm

Umm.

"Plan B is OK" means (more or less) "Plan B is quite good"
"quite good" means (more or less) "OK".

Often, (but unfortunately not always), it is a way of saying the plan is not a bad one, but is also not really a good one. It's a way of saying something is not good without rudely saying it is bad. Other ways of doing the same thing include using the words "mediocre", "average", "satisfactory" and many more.

Oddly, the phrase "not bad" is used to mean "pretty good" which means (usually) "good to very good".

We have far too many ways of saying things in English! (But I imagine Farsi is just as difficult).

soheil_hooshdaran
Posts: 2499
Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:24 pm

Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Fri Oct 12, 2018 5:53 pm

What does it mean that
Black needs some primitive action?

Thanks in advance

soheil_hooshdaran
Posts: 2499
Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:24 pm

Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Sat Oct 13, 2018 6:43 pm

What does mistaken mean in:
A good chess-player refuses to act without any plan, even if this plan sometimes turns out to be mistaken in the long run.

Deriven at by wrong judgement, or erroneous?

soheil_hooshdaran
Posts: 2499
Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:24 pm

Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Sat Oct 13, 2018 10:02 pm

What does it mean to 'drum up' initiative/counterplay/primitive action?

Thanks in advance

soheil_hooshdaran
Posts: 2499
Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:24 pm

Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Fri Oct 19, 2018 8:50 am

Having "there is also a threat to Black's centre involving an eventual Bc2-b3 followed by gS." , how can an eventual move be followed by something else?

Thanks in advance

User avatar
Matt Mackenzie
Posts: 2550
Joined: Tue Mar 31, 2009 11:51 pm
Location: Millom, Cumbria

Re: The English Language

Post by Matt Mackenzie » Fri Oct 19, 2018 2:40 pm

Why shouldn't it be? The plan is to play such and such a manoeuvre and then follow it up with another move.
"Set up your attacks so that when the fire is out, it isn't out!" (H N Pillsbury)

soheil_hooshdaran
Posts: 2499
Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:24 pm

Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Sun Oct 21, 2018 6:34 am

Thanks.
What does it mean that
White's plans are now easy to establish.

?Thanks in advance

User avatar
Matt Mackenzie
Posts: 2550
Joined: Tue Mar 31, 2009 11:51 pm
Location: Millom, Cumbria

Re: The English Language

Post by Matt Mackenzie » Sun Oct 21, 2018 1:04 pm

Now easy to confirm, bring into action? The precise nuance depends on the context of the term.
"Set up your attacks so that when the fire is out, it isn't out!" (H N Pillsbury)

soheil_hooshdaran
Posts: 2499
Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:24 pm

Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Mon Oct 22, 2018 9:03 am

Matt Mackenzie wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 1:04 pm
Now easy to confirm, bring into action? The precise nuance depends on the context of the term.
The paragraph reads:
White's plans are now easy to establish. First
he will push his b-pawn to b7 and then:
a) ...
b)...

User avatar
Matt Mackenzie
Posts: 2550
Joined: Tue Mar 31, 2009 11:51 pm
Location: Millom, Cumbria

Re: The English Language

Post by Matt Mackenzie » Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:06 pm

Thus in the sense of "easy to discern/work out", I would say.
"Set up your attacks so that when the fire is out, it isn't out!" (H N Pillsbury)

soheil_hooshdaran
Posts: 2499
Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:24 pm

Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Tue Oct 23, 2018 5:32 am

The position is opposite side castling.
He wrote:"I must not waste any time and opt for a direct attack with 12 g4."
My common sense says their should be a 'must' before the underlined, but grammerly I don't think so. What do you think guys?

Thanks in advance

Barry Sandercock
Posts: 1323
Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2012 10:52 am

Re: The English Language

Post by Barry Sandercock » Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:02 am

NO. No need for “must.”

Post Reply