The English Language

A section to discuss matters not related to Chess in particular.
soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Fri May 21, 2021 2:05 pm

Thanks.
What does strive mean in:
...the exercise of the power that strives in the nature of a great constructive people

NickFaulks
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Re: The English Language

Post by NickFaulks » Fri May 21, 2021 2:20 pm

What does anything in that phrase mean?
If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face — forever.

Ross Brennan
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Joined: Tue Dec 29, 2020 11:38 am

Re: The English Language

Post by Ross Brennan » Fri May 21, 2021 8:40 pm

soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Fri May 21, 2021 2:05 pm
Thanks.
What does strive mean in:
...the exercise of the power that strives in the nature of a great constructive people
I would say that whoever wrote that did not strive for great clarity of expression.

But strive here presumably means the same as strive everywhere else - to try very hard.

"the power that strives" is something like the strong desire of the people to achieve great things.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Wed May 26, 2021 4:39 pm

Excuse me, please check the English of this
webpage:
https://denahospital.ir/

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Wed May 26, 2021 4:43 pm

Ross Brennan wrote:
Fri May 21, 2021 8:40 pm
soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Fri May 21, 2021 2:05 pm
Thanks.
What does strive mean in:
...the exercise of the power that strives in the nature of a great constructive people
I would say that whoever wrote that did not strive for great clarity of expression.

But strive here presumably means the same as strive everywhere else - to try very hard.

"the power that strives" is something like the strong desire of the people to achieve great things.
Ok, I understand that a power can strive, but what about exercise of power?

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Wed Jun 02, 2021 7:46 am

What does it mean that:

The objects with which development began to deal after 1945 were numerous and varied.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Wed Jun 02, 2021 9:16 am

What does
In the last instance
mean?

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Thu Jun 03, 2021 11:53 am

What does this sentence mean?
So much emphasis on this issue in the context of development, so strong a moralizing attitude probably would not have existed without the persistent anti-Communist preaching that originated in the cold war.
?

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Sun Jun 06, 2021 6:14 pm

Hello? No answer?
What's happening?

Ross Brennan
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Re: The English Language

Post by Ross Brennan » Fri Jun 11, 2021 7:46 pm

soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Wed Jun 02, 2021 9:16 am
What does
In the last instance
mean?
It is a hackneyed expression for which synonyms are "in the final analysis", "taking everything into account", or "when all is said and done". This kind of expression adds little or nothing, in terms of genuine meaning to a sentence. You could think of it as a kind of emphasis.

For example: In the last instance, it is difficult to say who is the best chess player of all time.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:24 pm

Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Sat Jun 12, 2021 6:23 pm

Ross Brennan wrote:
Fri Jun 11, 2021 7:46 pm
soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Wed Jun 02, 2021 9:16 am
What does
In the last instance
mean?
It is a hackneyed expression for which synonyms are "in the final analysis", "taking everything into account", or "when all is said and done". This kind of expression adds little or nothing, in terms of genuine meaning to a sentence. You could think of it as a kind of emphasis.

For example: In the last instance, it is difficult to say who is the best chess player of all time.
Thanks

Ross Brennan
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Joined: Tue Dec 29, 2020 11:38 am

Re: The English Language

Post by Ross Brennan » Sun Jun 13, 2021 1:35 pm

soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Wed Jun 02, 2021 7:46 am
What does it mean that:

The objects with which development began to deal after 1945 were numerous and varied.
I am not entirely sure about this one. Since it mentions 1945, that suggests that the reference is to development following the Second World War. The word "objects" slightly confuses me, and I might prefer the term "issues". But that is probably a matter of taste.

Given that, I assume that the sentence refers to the national and international efforts to achieve economic recovery following the Second World War. These were, indeed, many and varied. Many countries needed to rebuild their basic infrastructure, such as roads and railways. Economies had to be restructured away from a war footing; for example, factories that had been adapted to make weapons and ammunition had to be returned to peacetime production. The whole international economic system had to adapt to the increased dominance of the USA, which had been far less damaged than other major economies during the war. For example, the Bretton Woods system of international financial management was put in place, with the US dollar as the major international currency.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Mon Jun 14, 2021 4:32 am

Thanks Ross
What's the difference between "fostering a way", "opening a way", and "creating a way"

Ross Brennan
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Re: The English Language

Post by Ross Brennan » Tue Jun 15, 2021 12:13 pm

soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Mon Jun 14, 2021 4:32 am
Thanks Ross
What's the difference between "fostering a way", "opening a way", and "creating a way"
This might be too nuanced for me; I'm not sure I can answer it with confidence.

The verb "to open" is often used with the direct article in this context. Thus, "vaccination opens THE way to greater social contact". "Creating a way" seems to imply more intentional action, e.g. "Russia and China agreed a trade deal, creating a way to open up new business opportunities". "Fostering a way" may be a bit less definitive than the other two, i.e. providing the opportunity for a way to be opened or created, but not actively opening it.

However, I admit I am not entirely sure!

soheil_hooshdaran
Posts: 3085
Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:24 pm

Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Thu Jun 17, 2021 5:24 am

Thanks

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