Pedants United

A section to discuss matters not related to Chess in particular.
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MJMcCready
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Re: Pedants United

Post by MJMcCready » Wed Oct 21, 2020 3:16 pm

Kevin Thurlow wrote:
Sat Oct 17, 2020 8:06 pm
'Black overtakes the initiative.'

That is a good one - I assume he meant "takes over", but it is complicated in other languages. What he said was quite poetic though.
He may have been reading old editions of Viz because in one of them it says 'It's best to remember chess is like a race. You have to overtake their bits before they overtake you.'

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MJMcCready
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Re: Pedants United

Post by MJMcCready » Thu Oct 22, 2020 4:18 am

Should 'balding' be considered as a verb? Bald is a noun.

Roger de Coverly
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Re: Pedants United

Post by Roger de Coverly » Thu Oct 22, 2020 8:33 am

MJMcCready wrote:
Thu Oct 22, 2020 4:18 am
Should 'balding' be considered as a verb? Bald is a noun.
It's an adjective as in "a balding man". On the subject of hair, you might also write "a greying man".

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MJMcCready
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Re: Pedants United

Post by MJMcCready » Thu Oct 22, 2020 10:20 am

Hmmm, so then I think it's a ground.

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MJMcCready
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Re: Pedants United

Post by MJMcCready » Thu Oct 22, 2020 10:21 am

Hmmm, so then I think it's a gerund.

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MJMcCready
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Re: Pedants United

Post by MJMcCready » Thu Oct 22, 2020 10:31 am

Hmmm, so then I think it's a gerund.

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John Clarke
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Re: Pedants United

Post by John Clarke » Fri Oct 23, 2020 12:51 am

Roger is right. Not every adjective that ends in "-ing" necessarily has to derive from a verb.
"The chess-board is the world ..... the player on the other side is hidden from us ..... he never overlooks a mistake, or makes the smallest allowance for ignorance."
(He doesn't let you resign and start again, either.)

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MJMcCready
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Re: Pedants United

Post by MJMcCready » Fri Oct 23, 2020 9:25 am

That's true but not the norm.

Kevin Thurlow
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Re: Pedants United

Post by Kevin Thurlow » Sat Oct 24, 2020 12:52 pm

I have just read a leaflet for some medicine and noted the comment, "The tablet can be divided into equal halves."

Kevin Thurlow
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Re: Pedants United

Post by Kevin Thurlow » Tue Oct 27, 2020 11:53 am

Classic bit of BBC sport reporting on website (on a pass from Trent Alexander Arnold)

"It didn't just split the Sheffield United defence in two, it literally dissected it."

It didn't "literally" do anything.

Cutting into two would be "bisecting", so they might have accidentally got that right...

Neil Graham
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Re: Pedants United

Post by Neil Graham » Tue Oct 27, 2020 4:49 pm

Kevin Thurlow wrote:
Tue Oct 27, 2020 11:53 am
Classic bit of BBC sport reporting on website (on a pass from Trent Alexander Arnold)

"It didn't just split the Sheffield United defence in two, it literally dissected it."

It didn't "literally" do anything.

Cutting into two would be "bisecting", so they might have accidentally got that right...
Was this the same commentator who suggested a player "centred the ball into the middle"?

Kevin Thurlow
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Re: Pedants United

Post by Kevin Thurlow » Tue Oct 27, 2020 5:04 pm

"Was this the same commentator who suggested a player "centred the ball into the middle"?"

Maybe, but the bad thing was that the example I cited was written. I can understand someone getting tangled in speech in the heat of the moment.

Paul Habershon
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Re: Pedants United

Post by Paul Habershon » Tue Nov 03, 2020 12:38 pm

'Leela Chess Zero has been hunkering down since the opening, and Stockfish has lain(sic) siege.'

It seems churlish to pick on this extract from Luke McShane's excellent Spectator chess column. I think he is an outstanding chess journalist. Perhaps he is the victim of a rogue subeditor. Even so, such a small error does not spoil the chess content.

However, the pedant's thread began with my obsession about the verbs to lie and to lay. I think I am right in saying that the above should be 'laid siege'. 'Lain' is part of the intransitive 'lie' ('the barrels had lain in the cellar for several years'), whereas 'laid' is from the transitive 'lay' ('he laid the barrels in the in cellar'). It would be laying siege (direct object) not lying siege.

The problem is that 'lay' can also come from 'lie' ('the barrels lay in the cellar').

As I may have mentioned before, I do cringe at 'going for a lay-down or having a lay-in'. Lie, please!

Kevin Thurlow
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Re: Pedants United

Post by Kevin Thurlow » Tue Nov 03, 2020 1:44 pm

A report on the "Pride of Britain" Awards said that "Carol Vorderman arrived in a helicopter wearing a blue dress". By an amazing coincidence, Carol was wearing a blue dress as well.

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MJMcCready
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Re: Pedants United

Post by MJMcCready » Wed Nov 04, 2020 4:55 am

I came across 'I have lived there for all my life'. Do we need for + all in the same sentence? Doesn't seem so.

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