The growth of other strategy games

A section to discuss matters not related to Chess in particular.
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Rob Thompson
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Re: The growth of other strategy games

Post by Rob Thompson » Fri Mar 21, 2014 7:32 pm

Diplomacy is still about, but as Martin said it's a completely separate thing. There's a reasonable amount played online, but it's very rare to see face-to-face games.
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Mick Norris
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Re: The growth of other strategy games

Post by Mick Norris » Fri Mar 21, 2014 8:13 pm

John McKenna wrote:Thanks, Martin, but what of Risk?
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David Robertson
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Re: The growth of other strategy games

Post by David Robertson » Fri Mar 21, 2014 9:15 pm

Rob Thompson wrote:Diplomacy is still about...There's a reasonable amount played online, but it's very rare to see face-to-face games.
Face-to-face is the only way, imo. It's how my native verbal skills and endearing charm allowed me to conquer all. I never been a 'Turkey' by the way.

But we'd play it over a day or so. Multiple interactions; lengthy negotiations; building up trust which, of course, I could be relied upon to honour. And then realpolitik would kick in...

After winning, I'd feel a tad disappointed. Instead of cheery applause, I'd receive sullen looks, even verbal abuse. Not like chess then :P

Risk? Just dice-rolling. A game for muppets.
Last edited by David Robertson on Fri Mar 21, 2014 9:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Roger de Coverly
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Re: The growth of other strategy games

Post by Roger de Coverly » Fri Mar 21, 2014 9:21 pm

David Robertson wrote:Multiple interactions; lengthy negotiations; building up trust which, of course, I could be relied upon to honour.
I have a memory of Jack Rudd comparing Diplomacy to the ECF Board and Council, possibly before he was invited to join the game. I think he expressed the view that Diplomacy had a better set of rules.

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Rob Thompson
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Re: The growth of other strategy games

Post by Rob Thompson » Sat Mar 22, 2014 12:08 am

I play best as either Italy or England, although that may be because on the website I play on there are an almost obscene number of Lepanto's making Turkey a real grind to play.
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Re: The growth of other strategy games

Post by Neill Cooper » Sun Mar 23, 2014 8:23 am

Speaking with one 18 year old who played chess up to age 12, an important difference between chess and card games like Magic: The Gathering is that if you are not very good the card games are still enjoyable but chess is not.

As chess clubs and players, we tend to focus on the best players, whereas all players are important. We should try to ensure that weaker players are happy at our club, and that weak teams are happy in the tournaments they play in. That way they will continue to take part. Other players/teams are more likely to be content as they win more of their games/matches. If the weakest players/teams do drop out then a new player/team fills that role and there can then be a downwards spiral in participation, as has been seen in too many clubs and leagues.

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Re: The growth of other strategy games

Post by MartinCarpenter » Sun Mar 23, 2014 8:56 am

Very important to do that yes, but also as you say hard.

Competitive chess simply is, by its very nature, a pretty unforgiving beast. One game/evening and basically nothing to blame but yourself if/when(!) it goes wrong. A large part of what makes it worthwhile of course, but to be honest if you're not going to take it fully seriously (and a lot of people won't want to for very sensible reasons)/aren't at least moderately good then objectively you simply are going to have more fun with Euro board games, Bridge etc.

Its why there's so many more bridge players out there.

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Re: The growth of other strategy games

Post by Neill Cooper » Sun Mar 23, 2014 9:06 am

MartinCarpenter wrote:Very important to do that yes, but also as you say hard.

Competitive chess simply is, by its very nature, a pretty unforgiving beast. One game/evening and basically nothing to blame but yourself if/when(!) it goes wrong. A large part of what makes it worthwhile of course, but to be honest if you're not going to take it fully seriously (and a lot of people won't want to for very sensible reasons)/aren't at least moderately good then objectively you simply are going to have more fun with Euro board games, Bridge etc.

Its why there's so many more bridge players out there.
But chess clubs (as opposed to chess teams) do not have to always be serious and competitive. They can organise short games of chess, more informal chess, study positions etc. If clubs try then it can be more enjoyable for weak players.

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Jon Mahony
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Re: The growth of other strategy games

Post by Jon Mahony » Tue Mar 25, 2014 12:56 pm

A friend of mine at work regularly plays Magic with her boyfriend and flat mates (I believe the flat mate is much more seriously into it, and at last count has spent almost 2k on cards) She has been to a few organised tournaments, usually in comic book shops.

I must say I've always fancied a go at it, but I doubt I'd be able to get interested to the level required - also I think I would find the limited life span of cards a rip off - I have to say I've probably spent something in the 1k range in chess books and DVDs over the years, but at least they don't go out of date until someone refutes the analysis :)

I also like a game of Risk and Monopoly (which can be argued is a strategy game) - there are regular Monopoly tournaments in America, even a World Championship every few years, but they are very rare in the UK sadly - I'd more than likely enter a few as my other half loves playing as well, so it would be something we could do together.

Last time there was one in the UK that I am aware of, was held several years ago at Blackpool's Imperial (former venue of the Chess Congress)
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