The English Language

A section to discuss matters not related to Chess in particular.
Mike Gunn
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Re: The English Language

Post by Mike Gunn » Tue Jul 16, 2019 10:28 am

White wins the game efficiently from an overwhelming position.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Wed Jul 17, 2019 7:04 am

So he already has an overwhelming position?

John McKenna
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Joined: Tue May 17, 2011 2:02 pm

Re: The English Language

Post by John McKenna » Wed Jul 17, 2019 8:46 am

Yes, in order to summarily finish the game off ("roll up Black") the position must be overwhelmingly in White's favour.
To find a for(u)m that accommodates the mess, that is the task of the artist now. (Samuel Beckett)

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Sat Jul 20, 2019 7:47 pm

Thanks.
What does it mean that Bf1 hangs b3 after Bc2
?

Roger de Coverly
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Re: The English Language

Post by Roger de Coverly » Sat Jul 20, 2019 8:24 pm

soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Sat Jul 20, 2019 7:47 pm
What does it mean that Bf1 hangs b3 after Bc2?
You should give more context but "hangs" is an American usage generally meaning to leave en prise.

If there is a White pawn on b3 defended by a white Bishop on 4, then White's move Bc4-f1 may allow Black to play Bc2 with a threat to the pawn.

John McKenna
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Re: The English Language

Post by John McKenna » Sun Jul 21, 2019 11:14 am

The scenario Roger envisages, above, with a white pawn on b3, a white bishop on c4 and a black white-square bishop lurking somewhere it can presumably reach c2 in one fell swoop, if the white bishop allows it to, can be more generally pictured as follows -

White pawn on b3, white bishop anywhere on the diagonal f1-a6, except f1, and a black bishop somewhere on b1-h7 diagonal but not on c2.

(The whereabouts of the other white and black pawns and pieces is required in order to know exactly how the white move Bf1 'hangs' the b3 pawn to the black move Bc2.)

The use of the word 'hangs' implies the pawn can, and almost certainly will, be lost.

If the word 'drops' is used instead of 'hangs' then the implication is that the pawn on b3 will certainly be lost.
To find a for(u)m that accommodates the mess, that is the task of the artist now. (Samuel Beckett)

soheil_hooshdaran
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Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2013 5:24 pm

Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Sat Sep 21, 2019 5:16 am

What is a Grande combination? Is it a complex combination?

John McKenna
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Re: The English Language

Post by John McKenna » Sat Sep 21, 2019 11:51 am

Grande is not an English word and it means "large" or "great" in the Romance languages (Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian and Romanian)

Such combinations are usually called great or brilliant combinations in English unadorned by grandiose foreign words.
To find a for(u)m that accommodates the mess, that is the task of the artist now. (Samuel Beckett)

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