The English Language

A section to discuss matters not related to Chess in particular.
Barry Sandercock
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Re: The English Language

Post by Barry Sandercock » Tue Jun 05, 2018 11:03 am

Soheil Hooshdaran wrote:
What's the difference between aspiration and hope ?

No difference.

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Matt Mackenzie
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Re: The English Language

Post by Matt Mackenzie » Tue Jun 05, 2018 1:02 pm

Barry Sandercock wrote:
Tue Jun 05, 2018 11:03 am
Soheil Hooshdaran wrote:
What's the difference between aspiration and hope ?

No difference.
I would say there *is*, but its not that easy to define to an "outsider". For practical purposes, they mean much the same thing.
"Set up your attacks so that when the fire is out, it isn't out!" (H N Pillsbury)

Ian Thompson
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Re: The English Language

Post by Ian Thompson » Tue Jun 05, 2018 7:48 pm

Matt Mackenzie wrote:
Tue Jun 05, 2018 1:02 pm
Barry Sandercock wrote:
Tue Jun 05, 2018 11:03 am
Soheil Hooshdaran wrote:
What's the difference between aspiration and hope ?

No difference.
I would say there *is*, but its not that easy to define to an "outsider". For practical purposes, they mean much the same thing.
I'd say that one difference is that aspiration implies a long term goal, while hope could be either short term or long term. For example "I aspire to be a grandmaster one day" would be normal use of the word, and "hope" would be fine as well. It would be unusual to say "I aspire to win my game of chess today"; for that "hope" would be the normal word to use.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Wed Jun 06, 2018 12:54 pm

Thanks forumees.
What does "mod­em chess practice" mean exactly?
"Try to under­stand it and benefit as much as possible from its almost mythical significance in the world of mod­em chess practice" [he means the symbol +\=]

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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Wed Jun 06, 2018 2:40 pm

What does it mean that
"...this is ofcourse not the rule"?

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IM Jack Rudd
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Re: The English Language

Post by IM Jack Rudd » Wed Jun 06, 2018 2:49 pm

My guess is that there should be commas around "of course", making it a parenthetical expression.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Wed Jun 06, 2018 8:26 pm

My question is about 'the rule'. What does it mean? Why not 'a rule'? why not law?

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IM Jack Rudd
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Re: The English Language

Post by IM Jack Rudd » Wed Jun 06, 2018 9:32 pm

This may be a sentence where the rule is an idiom; I'd need the first half of the sentence (or, if it's the whole sentence, the preceding sentence) to know whether it is or not.

As a more general rule, law is rather more specific than rule; for example, if I were talking about chess, a law would specifically be something that I could find in the FIDE Laws of Chess or some other official document, whereas a rule could be that, but it could also be a piece of strategic advice, or a requirement imposed by a specific event, or something.

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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:16 am

Who creates holes?
Sooner or later, White will have to play a3, creating some 'holes' on b3 and c4.
Last edited by soheil_hooshdaran on Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:17 am, edited 1 time in total.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:17 am

IM Jack Rudd wrote:
Wed Jun 06, 2018 9:32 pm
This may be a sentence where the rule is an idiom; I'd need the first half of the sentence (or, if it's the whole sentence, the preceding sentence) to know whether it is or not.
More usual are the plans we draw right after the end of the opening phase, but this is of course not the rule

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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:27 am

Black can continue with ... Na5 and ... b5 (the reason for 1O ... Bd7!), cre­ating the possibility of a ... b4 advance, or simply occupying the c4-square
does it read ...creating the possibility of simply occupying ....?

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Jon Tait
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Re: The English Language

Post by Jon Tait » Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:56 am

soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:27 am
Black can continue with ... Na5 and ... b5 (the reason for 1O ... Bd7!), cre­ating the possibility of a ... b4 advance, or simply occupying the c4-square
does it read ...creating the possibility of simply occupying ....?
yes, the comma after "advance" is both unnecessary and confusing
blog inspired by Bronstein's book, but using my own games: http://200opengames.blogspot.co.uk/

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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Thu Jun 07, 2018 10:50 am

What's the difference between saying 'White was quite helpful' and 'White was nicely helpful' or 'White was in a good way helpful'?

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IM Jack Rudd
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Re: The English Language

Post by IM Jack Rudd » Thu Jun 07, 2018 11:14 am

Your question about holes: the entity that creates holes is the act of white's playing a3.

Your question about helpfulness: "quite" here simply modifies the intensity of the helpfulness, and doesn't speak to the manner of it.

Your question about "the rule": I think we may be looking at definition 2a here: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rule

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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Sat Jun 09, 2018 8:16 pm

Any difference between
I have reasonable possibilities of an attack in the future.
and
I have reasonable chances of an attack in the future.

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