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Re: The English Language

Posted: Thu Jul 12, 2018 8:33 pm
by soheil_hooshdaran
What does it mean to say that a continuation
:would rather favour me"?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Thu Jul 12, 2018 8:52 pm
by Ian Thompson
soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Thu Jul 12, 2018 8:33 pm
What does it mean to say that a continuation
:would rather favour me"?
In this context rather means "to a certain or significant extent".

Re: The English Language

Posted: Fri Jul 13, 2018 6:00 am
by soheil_hooshdaran
ٌWhat does
"I should concentrate on the centre, exchanging my 'bad' bishop" mean?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Fri Jul 13, 2018 5:28 pm
by soheil_hooshdaran
A continuation like [...] would allow me to gain the initiative on this side of the board
means
A continuation like [...] can allow me to gain the initiative on this side of the board
or is there a difference?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Sat Jul 14, 2018 11:55 am
by Barry Sandercock
No difference really, but " would allow me " and " will allow me" would be more correct.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Sat Jul 14, 2018 1:43 pm
by soheil_hooshdaran
Thanks.
What does it mean that
I think my compensation will be more than fine.

What does fine mean really? How does it differ from good?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Sat Jul 14, 2018 4:01 pm
by Matt Mackenzie
soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Fri Jul 13, 2018 6:00 am
ٌWhat does
"I should concentrate on the centre, exchanging my 'bad' bishop" mean?
You don't know what an "exchange" is in chess??

Re: The English Language

Posted: Sat Jul 14, 2018 7:45 pm
by soheil_hooshdaran
Matt Mackenzie wrote:
Sat Jul 14, 2018 4:01 pm
soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Fri Jul 13, 2018 6:00 am
ٌWhat does
"I should concentrate on the centre, exchanging my 'bad' bishop" mean?
You don't know what an "exchange" is in chess??
I mean what does the -ing suffix mean.
What would the exchange have to do with central play?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Sat Jul 14, 2018 8:12 pm
by soheil_hooshdaran
Does Modern in Modern Chess Planning moddify chess or Planning and why?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 9:23 am
by E Michael White
soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Sat Jul 14, 2018 8:12 pm
Does Modern in Modern Chess Planning moddify chess or Planning and why?
The adjective modern qualifies the noun planning. But to be sure we need the context. It is possible to construct a sentence where the noun chess is qualified. You have raised one of the most difficult aspects of modern English usage; words acting outside their normal usage. A small point is that it is usual to refer to an adjective qualifying a noun not modifying a noun. An adverb is usually referred to as modifying a verb.

In your example the words are used:-

modern : pure adjective
chess : noun used as adjective
planning : gerund used as noun

So the word modern qualifies the noun planning.

No doubt on this forum there will be those who argue chess planning is a compound two word noun and that gerunds don't exist as in previous postings.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 9:29 am
by Roger de Coverly
E Michael White wrote:
Sun Jul 15, 2018 9:23 am
No doubt on this forum there will be those who argue chess planning is a compound two word noun and that gerunds don't exist as in previous postings.
Modern Chess something is a well used construction. Modern Chess Openings being a case in point. Modern Openings in Chess would have the same meaning. Modern Planning in Chess would be an alternative to Modern Chess Planning.

The title of the book could be Modern Planning if you knew it would be always categorised as chess.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Mon Jul 16, 2018 8:11 pm
by Barry Sandercock
Soheil Hooshdaran wrote:
What does it mean that "I think my compensation will be more than fine "
What does fine mean really ? How does it differ from good ?

In this context, fine does mean good.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Wed Jul 18, 2018 3:49 pm
by soheil_hooshdaran
What's the difference between
although Black has a passive position, it is a tough nut to crack.
and
although Black has a passive position, it is difficult to penetrate.
?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Wed Jul 18, 2018 7:42 pm
by Barry Sandercock
No difference. " Tough nut to crack" is a metaphor meaning a difficult problem to solve.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Thu Jul 19, 2018 7:41 am
by soheil_hooshdaran
Why does he keep saying 'spatial advantage' and not 'space advantage'?