The English Language

A section to discuss matters not related to Chess in particular.
soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Mon Sep 24, 2018 12:49 am

Andy Stoker wrote:
Tue Aug 28, 2018 11:52 am
"What does objectively mean in:
White's position is objectively lost in either case."
If the game was played out using "perfect" analysis, then white will lose - s/he is objectively lost. If strong computer plays strong computer, then white loses

However, some other factors might affect the result - for example, black might fail to see the correct continuation, black might get into time trouble and make a mistake ...
So objectively means in itself?

Barry Sandercock
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Re: The English Language

Post by Barry Sandercock » Mon Sep 24, 2018 10:51 am

Objectively means "in a way not influenced by personal feelings and opinions. "

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Tue Sep 25, 2018 8:50 pm

It is rather early to give a fr evaluation of the position.

What's a firm evaluation?

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Thu Sep 27, 2018 7:38 pm

Hi. What does it mean that
Plan B ( 1 0 points) has a point?
Plan B ( 1 0 points) has a point, as after 13 th4 l:b8 14 b3 g6 ! 15 tf3 ! .g4 16 td2 .g7 17 h3 .e6 18 l:fd 1Jd8 White can switch back to the right track
with 1 9 b4! +/=, but of course White has lost valuable time.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Fri Sep 28, 2018 5:31 am

on top means winning or better?

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Matt Mackenzie
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Re: The English Language

Post by Matt Mackenzie » Fri Sep 28, 2018 3:25 pm

Yes, it can actually mean either of those things.
"Set up your attacks so that when the fire is out, it isn't out!" (H N Pillsbury)

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Fri Sep 28, 2018 10:04 pm

Matt Mackenzie wrote:
Fri Sep 28, 2018 3:25 pm
Yes, it can actually mean either of those things.
Thanks, and What about the 'has a point question?

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Sat Sep 29, 2018 1:11 am

What's the difference between forming a plan and drawing up a plan, plus any other verbs connected with plan?

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Sat Sep 29, 2018 8:26 am

What is the definition of 'target' in chess?

Barry Sandercock
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Re: The English Language

Post by Barry Sandercock » Sat Sep 29, 2018 3:01 pm

Need to see the context, but the target is probably the opponents King.

Barry Sandercock
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Re: The English Language

Post by Barry Sandercock » Sat Sep 29, 2018 3:05 pm

Soheil Hooshdaran wrote:
What`s the difference between forming a plan and drawing up a plan ?

No difference.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Sat Sep 29, 2018 7:53 pm

  • Determine what is (are) the main, most signifcant target(s) and how the plan should be executed.
    I should attack the e-pawns, starting with the one on e5 . This can be done by manoeuvring my minor pieces (by .fl and td2-c4) towards that target and also involving my queen via b5 or c3.
    The e4-pawn is a target for the b7-
    bishop.
    I think that my d4-knight is actually not very well placed, as it has no targets
    my main target is his king
    my knight will fnd a nice target on b7.
    I should fnd play on the queenside, where there are some fxed targets, such as the black pawns on a5 and b7.

    ...
I am asking foe the definition of a target in chess , not the piece that is the target. Both target and goal and aim and objective are translated into "hadaf", in everyday speaking, and you can distinguish by the context. Here it will be misunderstood.

Roger de Coverly
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Re: The English Language

Post by Roger de Coverly » Sat Sep 29, 2018 8:11 pm

soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Sat Sep 29, 2018 7:53 pm
I am asking foe the definition of a target in chess , not the piece that is the target. Both target and goal and aim and objective are translated into "hadaf", in everyday speaking, and you can distinguish by the context. Here it will be misunderstood.
Target has another meaning in English. In addition to its meaning as goal/aim/objective, it is also used in archery and shooting to refer to what the weapon is being aimed at. So a Bishop on b7 threatens to capture a pawn on e4, in other words setting it as a target.

Barry Sandercock
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Re: The English Language

Post by Barry Sandercock » Sat Sep 29, 2018 8:14 pm

The target is the thing you are aiming at,or the main object in view which you are concentrating on. Maybe someone else can give you a better answer.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Sat Sep 29, 2018 8:52 pm

Roger de Coverly wrote:
Sat Sep 29, 2018 8:11 pm
soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Sat Sep 29, 2018 7:53 pm
I am asking foe the definition of a target in chess , not the piece that is the target. Both target and goal and aim and objective are translated into "hadaf", in everyday speaking, and you can distinguish by the context. Here it will be misunderstood.
Target has another meaning in English. In addition to its meaning as goal/aim/objective, it is also used in archery and shooting to refer to what the weapon is being aimed at. So a Bishop on b7 threatens to capture a pawn on e4, in other words setting it as a target.
I thought target is just in a materialized form. Now that you say it can also be abstract, it is more confusing.

So what about "After [...]White has targets."?

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