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Re: Target

Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 5:20 pm
by soheil_hooshdaran
John McKenna wrote:
Thu Dec 06, 2018 1:05 pm
From a pocket dictionary -

target: a) something aimed/shot at or attacked b) a goal/objective
Specifically, here nothing 'is' aimed at/attacked
Determine what is (are) the main, most significant target(s) and how the plan should be executed.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 5:51 pm
by John McKenna
The things that are aimed at/attacked are the MAIN AND MOST SIGNIFICANT TARGETS!!

Another more fundamental 'target' is "... THE PLAN..."

Re: The English Language

Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:16 pm
by soheil_hooshdaran
Thanks. In
But although Black has a passive position, it is a tough nut to crack.

What does it refer to?

Thanks in advance

Re: The English Language

Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:28 pm
by John McKenna
... 'it' refers to the 3 words that preceded 'it'.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 8:59 pm
by soheil_hooshdaran
Andy Stoker wrote:
Fri Jul 27, 2018 8:32 pm
As others have discovered long ago, I see this is a one way street! I'm just told when my answers don't satisfy. And still I continue!

e5 / Bh3 can't be sure from the snippet - I'd guess Bh3 is an alternative to e5 .... not Bh3 and then e5. But you play chess - what do you think?
Bh3 pins the d7-Knight to the Black Q!ueen and makes e5 easier. HE can also play e5 at once. Which one is correct now?
https://www.google.co.uk/search?rlz=1C1 ... bs=plunder. White thinks that his pieces could enter the black position and take material
Thanks. Interesting.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Fri Dec 07, 2018 8:00 am
by soheil_hooshdaran
What's the difference between loss of time and wasting time?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Fri Dec 07, 2018 8:00 am
by soheil_hooshdaran
What's the difference between loss of time and wasting time?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Fri Dec 07, 2018 10:28 am
by John McKenna
Consulting a dictionary (see 'loss' & 'waste') will supply you with the answer you are seeking.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Fri Dec 07, 2018 12:14 pm
by soheil_hooshdaran
WEhat's the difference between 'be in trouble" and "fall into trouble"

Re: The English Language

Posted: Fri Dec 07, 2018 12:15 pm
by soheil_hooshdaran
John McKenna wrote:
Fri Dec 07, 2018 10:28 am
Consulting a dictionary (see 'loss' & 'waste') will supply you with the answer you are seeking.
I know their actual meaning. I mean in chess

Re: The English Language

Posted: Fri Dec 07, 2018 12:20 pm
by Roger de Coverly
soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Fri Dec 07, 2018 8:00 am
What's the difference between loss of time and wasting time?
Not so great, but "loss of time " is playing a piece to a square and then within a few moves playing it somewhere else assuming no relevant change to the position. Wasting time is playing moves like a6 and Rb8 when faced with a dangerous king side or central attack.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Fri Dec 07, 2018 12:39 pm
by John McKenna
In this instance it's the same in chess as in life e.g. -

I lost time by missing the shortcut and going the long way round.

I wasted time waiting for the bus on Sunday as I forgot there's no service that day.

Roger's chessical example, above, doesn't make that distinction clear.

Think of the difference between losing money - through a hole in a pocket- and wasting money - by gambling it away.

Time is money, or so they say.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Fri Dec 07, 2018 5:02 pm
by soheil_hooshdaran
Thanks. We say "Time is gld".

What's the diffeence between tiny, slight, and small advantage?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Fri Dec 07, 2018 5:56 pm
by John McKenna
Very little.

Again, although you are asking in a chess context, the adjectives (tiny, slight and small) mean the same as they do everyday life and therefore any good dictionary will explain the differences and nuances.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Fri Dec 07, 2018 6:19 pm
by Matt Mackenzie
I would have thought "tiny" would normally be smaller than the other two.