The English Language

A section to discuss matters not related to Chess in particular.
Andy Stoker
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Re: The English Language

Post by Andy Stoker » Sat Oct 19, 2019 11:46 am

Difficult to be sure without seeing the position - and any other context - are you sure that the rook is at f5 - not f6?

It sounds like the rook would no longer be protected and could be taken immediately or in due course. It's not clear from what you say why the rook couldn't take the queen.

The idiom - like others - can be easily looked up - eg https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/hang_out_to_dry

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Mon Nov 04, 2019 12:56 pm

Thanks.
What does it mean to nail down squares by your own pieces?

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Mon Nov 04, 2019 8:21 pm

What's the difference between a home and an outpost for one's pieces?

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Fri Nov 08, 2019 2:06 pm

What does it mean that after 1.c4 c5 2.b3 Nf6 3.Bb2 g6 White went out of his way to create the weak square, by playing Bxf6?
What was his "way"?

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IM Jack Rudd
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Re: The English Language

Post by IM Jack Rudd » Fri Nov 08, 2019 8:46 pm

You'll just confuse yourself if you try to think of what his "way" is. To "go out of one's way" is to make a special effort to do something, involving doing something you wouldn't otherwise do.

(The phrase does have a more literal meaning which is probably its source: to make some journey by a normally sub-optimal route, in order to do something at some specified intermediate spot.)

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:53 pm

Thanks

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Sun Dec 01, 2019 3:26 am

What does it mean that Black played 'quite' poorly?

Andy Stoker
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Re: The English Language

Post by Andy Stoker » Sun Dec 01, 2019 4:34 pm

This is an important English idiom to master.
"Quite" has two meanings - as a comparative and an absolute and I don't know how to distinguish the two uses for you. Here are two examples which mean different things:
"The reserves of fuel were quite exhausted" - means they were completely used up
"The level in the fuel tank was quite low" - means that the level was relatively low - for example, if the level varied but was generally at about 100 litres, then 70 litres would be "quite low" - whereas 0 litres would be "quite empty"

I don't have the knowledge to explain this - is it that "quite" with a continuous variable (the level in my example) indicates a relative amount, whilst "quite" with an absolute condition means completely - it is either used up or it's not.

I hope someone who knows what s/he is talking about can help us here!

Ian Thompson
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Re: The English Language

Post by Ian Thompson » Sun Dec 01, 2019 5:15 pm

soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Sun Dec 01, 2019 3:26 am
What does it mean that Black played 'quite' poorly?
Andy Stoker wrote:
Sun Dec 01, 2019 4:34 pm
This is an important English idiom to master.
"Quite" has two meanings - as a comparative and an absolute and I don't know how to distinguish the two uses for you. Here are two examples which mean different things:
"The reserves of fuel were quite exhausted" - means they were completely used up
"The level in the fuel tank was quite low" - means that the level was relatively low - for example, if the level varied but was generally at about 100 litres, then 70 litres would be "quite low" - whereas 0 litres would be "quite empty"
From the dictionary:

1. To the utmost or most absolute extent or degree; absolutely; completely. Alternative words you might use being completely, fully, entirely, totally, wholly, absolutely. An example, "it's quite out of the question".

2. To a certain or fairly significant extent or degree; fairly. Alternative words you might use being fairly, rather, somewhat, a bit, a little, slightly, relatively. An example "it's quite warm outside".

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Michael Farthing
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Re: The English Language

Post by Michael Farthing » Sun Dec 01, 2019 5:18 pm

Your explanation makes sense to me Andy. If we think of other absolute conditions it certainly fits.

He was quite dead (not partly dead or even nearly dead).
He was quite determined.

It's an interesting example and one that caused me problems when, in the way that was common in our youth, I was presented with a German vocabukary to learn for homework. It contained:

ganz completely, quite

and for long afterwards I believed the German word could be used for both meanings, getting me into a few misunderstandings!
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soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Tue Dec 10, 2019 9:46 am

What is the difference between a material advantage 'coming down' and 'leading' to checkmate?

John McKenna
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Re: The English Language

Post by John McKenna » Tue Dec 10, 2019 2:08 pm

A material advantage can often come down (lead) to checkmate.

So just another way of saying the same thing.
To find a for(u)m that accommodates the mess, that is the task of the artist now. (Samuel Beckett)

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: The English Language

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Wed Dec 18, 2019 8:29 pm

Thanks.
What's a 'pretty move'?

John McKenna
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Re: The English Language

Post by John McKenna » Thu Dec 19, 2019 2:18 am

One that looks nice, perhaps.

It should be contrasted with the much more commonly played, and written about, "ugly move".
To find a for(u)m that accommodates the mess, that is the task of the artist now. (Samuel Beckett)

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Matt Mackenzie
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Re: The English Language

Post by Matt Mackenzie » Thu Dec 19, 2019 1:35 pm

A "pretty move" is usually one that is strong as well (on the odd occasion is it not, that is usually made clear)
"Set up your attacks so that when the fire is out, it isn't out!" (H N Pillsbury)

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