Page 208 of 218

Re: The English Language

Posted: Fri Feb 07, 2020 7:18 pm
by soheil_hooshdaran
Sorry, "Grist for the mill" is "something that opens the way"?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Fri Feb 07, 2020 9:02 pm
by Matt Mackenzie
In a sense, perhaps. "Enables" may be an even better word though.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Sat Feb 08, 2020 3:18 am
by soheil_hooshdaran
Matt Mackenzie wrote:
Fri Feb 07, 2020 9:02 pm
In a sense, perhaps. "Enables" may be an even better word though.
The problem is that the reference of "the mill" is not known to me. That is, I can't know it "enables" what or even opens what way.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Sat Feb 08, 2020 9:11 am
by John McKenna
The reference to a mill in "grist to the mill' is a general one.

An example of a 'mill' is a windmill.

Windmills used to be a common sight in Europe.

Do you know what windmills look like and what purpose they serve(d)? (If you look back through this thread at my comments you will find I tried, and failed it would seem, to give some idea of the kind of mill we are talking about here.)

More than enough explanation has been supplied about "grist to the mill" for you to discern the meaning of that idiom even if you still struggle to translate it into your native tongue.

As I said before, you should consult a person in your own locale (a teacher or professor of English) who knows both English and your language well enough to explain the nuances of it.

I fear no more can be done here to enlighten you (at least not by me).

Bye.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Sat Feb 08, 2020 4:18 pm
by soheil_hooshdaran
John McKenna wrote:
Sat Feb 08, 2020 9:11 am
The reference to a mill in "grist to the mill' is a general one.

An example of a 'mill' is a windmill.

Windmills used to be a common sight in Europe.

Do you know what windmills look like and what purpose they serve(d)? (If you look back through this thread at my comments you will find I tried, and failed it would seem, to give some idea of the kind of mill we are talking about here.)

More than enough explanation has been supplied about "grist to the mill" for you to discern the meaning of that idiom even if you still struggle to translate it into your native tongue.

As I said before, you should consult a person in your own locale (a teacher or professor of English) who knows both English and your language well enough to explain the nuances of it.

I fear no more can be done here to enlighten you (at least not by me).

Bye.
sure I do.
I've seen a windmill in Netherlands, and we had mills in Iran, which used powers of quadrupeds, waters, اhands, or winds (we needed bread during these 3000 years to survive!).

When someone says something that can be used by the enemy, we say he is 'pouring water to the mill of the enemy'.
When we say the mill turns by blood to exaggerate about the killing.
the millstone of the time is the problems that occurs to you which is grinding your bone

Re: The English Language

Posted: Sat Feb 08, 2020 10:00 pm
by John McKenna
Fee-fi-fo-fum;

I smell the blood of an Englishman.

Be he alive or be he dead,

I'll grind his bones to make my bread.
[Old nursery rhyme]

Re: The English Language

Posted: Tue Feb 11, 2020 5:58 pm
by soheil_hooshdaran
seems "Grist for the mill" means useful, right?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Tue Feb 11, 2020 6:16 pm
by John McKenna
Not really - it still means something that is absolutely appropriate for the job being done.

Without the exchange sac move (the 'grist') the subsequent moves on the board (the turning of "the mill") would not yield the required result - a winning advantage.

And, if you say it means 'useful', once again, you'll just be "tilting at windmills" to try to wind me uP!

Re: The English Language

Posted: Wed Feb 12, 2020 7:09 am
by soheil_hooshdaran
"Grist for the mill" mean "firewood for fire"?
meaning the subsequent moves are fire?
So what about the previous moves?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Wed Feb 12, 2020 10:31 am
by John McKenna
You got it!

Did you get this?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Thu Feb 13, 2020 7:52 am
by soheil_hooshdaran
Well, I knew of that tournament, but I haven't been in Iran

Re: The English Language

Posted: Thu Feb 13, 2020 8:53 am
by John McKenna
Round round, get around,
I get around.

Get around, round round,
I get around

From town to town.
I'm a real cool head.
I'm makin' real good bread.

I get around...

Re: The English Language

Posted: Thu Feb 13, 2020 9:43 pm
by Andy Stoker
Ah ha!

Post by Andy Stoker » Mon Jan 20, 2020 5:20 am

"Grist for the mill" is similar to "Fuel for the fire" .... something that keeps the entity going. It doesn't mean "excuse"

Re: The English Language

Posted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 8:58 am
by John McKenna
soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Wed Feb 05, 2020 7:49 pm
SNIP
... And if, as Andy pointed out, it is keeping an entity alive, what is the entity?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Sat Feb 15, 2020 3:23 am
by soheil_hooshdaran
What does it mean that an in-between move is brusquely imposed?