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Re: The English Language

Posted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 12:24 am
by soheil_hooshdaran
What about these blunder on moves 26 and 27 by White?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 1:33 am
by Ian Thompson
soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Tue Apr 14, 2020 12:24 am
What about these blunder on moves 26 and 27 by White?
Blunders usually refer to moves that (should) lose or give away a win, not missing moves that would win and playing something else that only draws.

In this game you might describe Black's moves 25 and 26 as blunders, although move 25 in particular is more likely to just be described as a bad move. White missing Qh8+ twice would not be called a blunder.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 3:02 pm
by Matt Mackenzie
Its a pretty big oversight for someone of AAA's calibre arguably.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Thu May 14, 2020 9:55 am
by soheil_hooshdaran
Thanks.
What does it mean if an advantage is inappropriate"to" your position?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Sun May 17, 2020 3:13 am
by soheil_hooshdaran
What does "pervasive prevention" mean?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Sun Jun 21, 2020 8:07 pm
by Nick Ivell
I don't think I would ever use the term pervasive prevention.

I'm guessing the meaning is similar to Nimzowitsch's prophylaxis - stopping your opponents doing what they want to do.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Tue Jun 23, 2020 6:26 pm
by Nick Ivell
213 pages and still going. Quite remarkable.

A mistake may just be an inaccuracy. Question mark at best. A blunder merits a double question mark.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Mon Jun 29, 2020 3:19 am
by soheil_hooshdaran
Hi
Sorry, I didn't find the answer:
What is the difference between a thrust, a move, and a shot?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Mon Jun 29, 2020 5:48 pm
by Nick Ivell
A move is a neutral term to describe what White and Black do alternately.

A thrust is an aggressive move.

A shot is a surprising and strong move; a term popularised by Bobby Fischer, I believe.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Mon Jun 29, 2020 7:55 pm
by soheil_hooshdaran
Nick Ivell wrote:
Mon Jun 29, 2020 5:48 pm
A move is a neutral term to describe what White and Black do alternately.

A thrust is an aggressive move.

A shot is a surprising and strong move; a term popularised by Bobby Fischer, I believe.
Thanks / thank you

Re: The English Language

Posted: Sun Jul 05, 2020 1:49 am
by soheil_hooshdaran
What does this sentence mean?
If this variation looks too good to be true, it is!

Re: The English Language

Posted: Sun Jul 05, 2020 10:47 am
by IM Jack Rudd
Something like "this variation is so apparently good that you should be suspicious, and looking more closely at it will show that your suspicions were confirmed".

Re: The English Language

Posted: Sun Jul 05, 2020 11:00 am
by Nick Ivell
Not just true of chess but any activity. A warning against salespeople and commercial flannel generally.

Re: The English Language

Posted: Wed Aug 05, 2020 6:05 am
by soheil_hooshdaran
Is the sentence "White sets to exchange the queens." correct? What is the difference with "White tries to exchange the queens."?

Re: The English Language

Posted: Wed Aug 05, 2020 9:27 am
by Ian Thompson
soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Wed Aug 05, 2020 6:05 am
Is the sentence "White sets to exchange the queens." correct?
No, it should be "... sets out to ..."
soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Wed Aug 05, 2020 6:05 am
What is the difference with "White tries to exchange the queens."?
Not much difference after correcting to "sets out". Sets out suggests an ongoing objective of exchanging queens over many moves; tries might just be an attempt to exchange queens on a single move.