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Re: enjoy superiority?

Posted: Mon May 05, 2014 2:51 am
by soheil_hooshdaran
Arshad Ali wrote:And would relish with malice and schadenfreude the inferiority of the rook. And crow about it loudly and incessantly.
Is it the meaning of that statement?

Re: little

Posted: Mon May 05, 2014 3:06 am
by soheil_hooshdaran
Andrew Martin wrote:It means fake profile; a general taking of the piss.
I am registered in FIDE as 'Soheil Houshdaran' but my passport spelling in 'Hooshdaran'. I am not British. The "oo" and "ou" are both dipthonhgs standing for one Persian letter.

Re: enjoy superiority?

Posted: Mon May 05, 2014 9:58 am
by Michael Farthing
soheil_hooshdaran wrote:
Michael Farthing wrote:In this position the bishop would be more powerful than the rook.
Really?
There are some in this and other threads that are clearly irritated by your questions and are making unkind comments. I am not one of them and think it quite reasonable for you to ask for help on a chess forum about translating sentences from chess books. However, it would help if you would be clearer about you questions.

When you ask "Really?" do you mean:

"Surely the bishop is not more powerful than the rook"
or "Does powerful really mean the same as superiority"
or something else?

I wasn't able to open the attachment so my comment was simply an attempt to express the author's sentence in a different way, not a comment on the actual position. Whenever we try to use different words to say the same thing the meaning is going to change slightly. What I was seeking to do was to give you a feel for the ideas the author was trying to express.

Sharp

Posted: Thu May 08, 2014 9:58 am
by soheil_hooshdaran
Hi
What's the difference between Sharp, Aggressive, and Active positions?

Thanks in advance

Re: Sharp

Posted: Thu May 08, 2014 10:13 am
by Joey Stewart
Different words meaning the same thing - the position could be a loss for either side if they play a single wrong move. Theory books love to encourage these but, in practice, they are very stressful and best avoided over the board.

Re: Sharp

Posted: Thu May 08, 2014 10:34 am
by Ray Sayers

Re: Sharp

Posted: Thu May 08, 2014 10:43 am
by MartinCarpenter
Some people do of course tend to thrive on tactical chaos :)

Agressive play doesn't have to be genuinely tactically sharp. Sometimes its just a semi strategic slow burn attack or the like.

The same with active pieces, although active pieces do nearly always make for potential tactics somewhere or other.

Re: Sharp

Posted: Thu May 08, 2014 10:58 am
by Matt Fletcher
I'd have said "sharp", unlike the others, often suggests the possibility for tactical chances on both sides.

And "active" is often used where one side has given up something for the activity of his pieces (eg pawn structure or a small amount of material).

Re: Sharp

Posted: Thu May 08, 2014 11:00 am
by soheil_hooshdaran
My problem is that I have translated 'fast, aggressive positions' literally and a friend of mine says 'fast' should be translated as 'sharp' here.

Re: Sharp

Posted: Thu May 08, 2014 11:22 am
by MartinCarpenter
Probably it should, yes. Not sure I've ever seen a position described as fast before now. Volatile (fast changing) might be another option.

Re: Sharp

Posted: Thu May 08, 2014 12:11 pm
by Kevin Thurlow
Can you put questions like this in the "not chess" section of the forum please.

Re: Sharp

Posted: Thu May 08, 2014 12:23 pm
by Joey Stewart
I think it belongs in the chess section, it is probably more relevant to the actual game then many other posts here.

Event

Posted: Thu May 08, 2014 1:07 pm
by soheil_hooshdaran
Hi.
Any difference between a chess event and a chess tournament?

Thanks in advance

Re: Event

Posted: Thu May 08, 2014 1:29 pm
by Michael Farthing
A tournament is normally a competition to find the best team/player in a series of games
An event might be this, but could also be, for example, a simultaneous display.

The world championship match is certainly an event, but I think most English speakers might feel 'tournament' was not quite the right word if only two players are involved: we think of tournaments as having lots of players (well, I do).

Re: Event

Posted: Thu May 08, 2014 1:35 pm
by Gordon Cadden
A simultaneous display would be an event, demonstrating the dominant skill of one chess player.
A tournament would relate to the individual skills of every chess player in the competition.