EU referendum aftermath

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Roger de Coverly
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Re: EU referendum aftermath

Post by Roger de Coverly » Wed Oct 12, 2016 6:02 pm

NickFaulks wrote: The latter part of the 19th century is the most obvious case in point, when for decades deflation and economic growth coincided quite happily.
With stable money, increased productivity results in lower prices. Take today's electronic sector and compare the price and specification of a 1996 personal computer as against one today. The price is lower even in money terms, whilst the specification is much higher.

Mike Gunn
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Re: EU referendum aftermath

Post by Mike Gunn » Thu Oct 13, 2016 11:13 am

This is due to technological developments, not the value of the £.

soheil_hooshdaran
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Re: EU referendum aftermath

Post by soheil_hooshdaran » Thu Oct 13, 2016 5:12 pm

There is something called supply-demand curve, in economics.


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Christopher Kreuzer
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Re: EU referendum aftermath

Post by Christopher Kreuzer » Wed Oct 26, 2016 1:15 pm

Things aren't getting that much clearer:

Turbulent times ahead for the cabinet?

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Christopher Kreuzer
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Re: EU referendum aftermath

Post by Christopher Kreuzer » Thu Nov 03, 2016 10:20 am

Breaking news:

Government loses Article 50 court fight

(Has everyone lost interest in this thread?)

Jonathan Rogers
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Re: EU referendum aftermath

Post by Jonathan Rogers » Thu Nov 03, 2016 3:25 pm

Possibly. It is not difficult to find opportunities to contribute to more active threads on the subject elsewhere!

One could be forgiven for thinking that the government was happy to lose the High Court case, but that doesn't make very much sense. To be sure, MPs won't block Brexit but who knows what to expect in the Lords?

Nick Burrows
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Re: EU referendum aftermath

Post by Nick Burrows » Thu Nov 03, 2016 4:03 pm

I think the Lords successfully blocking it after both a referendum and a commons vote is close to zero.

Mick Norris
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Re: EU referendum aftermath

Post by Mick Norris » Tue Nov 08, 2016 4:50 pm

Now we have a problem Toblerone
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NickFaulks
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Re: EU referendum aftermath

Post by NickFaulks » Tue Nov 08, 2016 5:23 pm

Mick Norris wrote:Now we have a problem Toblerone
Which has what to do with the referendum?
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Christopher Kreuzer
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Re: EU referendum aftermath

Post by Christopher Kreuzer » Tue Nov 08, 2016 5:43 pm

Nothing. It is an interesting demonstration of weighing the cost of changing packaging for shorter bars (maybe they have large amounts of pre-made unused packets?) versus changing the content of the bars and risking a customers backlash.

Still, at least they didn't change the name (see Snickers vs Marathon and Opal Fruits vs Starburst).

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John Clarke
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Re: EU referendum aftermath

Post by John Clarke » Tue Nov 08, 2016 9:13 pm

Something else now to have a beef about concerning Toblerone! (My other, long-standing one is that you can't get the white or dark varieties here in the colonies, other than in airport duty-frees, and not always even then.)

We tend to perceive it out here as a high(-ish)-end product, so a price rise wouldn't have bothered us unduly; only to be expected, etc. But trimming the weight in that sneaky fashion is definitely contemptible. (A very common sort of trick, alas. I won't readily forget the jam-makers who suddenly began using octagonal jars instead of round ones of the same diameter .... leaving the price unchanged, of course.)

And - apologies in advance for off-topic rant - adulterating the ingredients will probably follow. Australian (not NZ) chocolate is already rubbish because they fill it with palm oil, allegedly so that it keeps better in their appalling climate.
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Michael Farthing
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Re: EU referendum aftermath

Post by Michael Farthing » Tue Nov 08, 2016 10:39 pm

OH!!! Starburst is really opal fruits? why don't they advertise that? I'll probably start buying it now I know.

Mick Norris
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Re: EU referendum aftermath

Post by Mick Norris » Wed Nov 09, 2016 8:12 am

John Clarke wrote:Something else now to have a beef about concerning Toblerone! (My other, long-standing one is that you can't get the white or dark varieties here in the colonies, other than in airport duty-frees, and not always even then.)

We tend to perceive it out here as a high(-ish)-end product, so a price rise wouldn't have bothered us unduly; only to be expected, etc. But trimming the weight in that sneaky fashion is definitely contemptible
I'm not sure that's accurate, they have changed the weight of 2 of the bars they sell in the UK, and changed the shape at the same time, but they haven't been secretive about it - ok, they aren't running a full advertising campaign, but you'd hardly expect them to do so

The reality is that the fall in the pound has increased the cost of some things on sale in the UK, and the effect has only just started, and more will follow; it is opportunist to blame all of this on brexit, but brexit has hastened the fall in sterling

Still, now we have Trump, who knows what will happen next?

No amount of eating chocolate helps sometimes; I know, I have tried :lol:
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Christopher Kreuzer
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Re: EU referendum aftermath

Post by Christopher Kreuzer » Wed Nov 09, 2016 10:32 am

I suppose a thread on Trump would be too depressing. Not a surprising result, really, though. It is clearly a sign of the times.

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