Dave Rumens

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Roger de Coverly
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Re: Dave Rumens

Post by Roger de Coverly » Sat Jul 15, 2017 10:41 pm

Gordon Cadden wrote:They knew the theoretical lines of play, and had no fear of Rumens aggressive style over the board.
There are a few examples where they came unstuck.

This may be one of the better known ones. The positions reached in this game hadn't been seen before and haven't been seen since.


Gordon Cadden
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Re: Dave Rumens

Post by Gordon Cadden » Sun Jul 16, 2017 6:11 am

Roger de Coverly wrote:
Gordon Cadden wrote:They knew the theoretical lines of play, and had no fear of Rumens aggressive style over the board.
There are a few examples where they came unstuck.

This may be one of the better known ones. The positions reached in this game hadn't been seen before and haven't been seen since.

7. ..., Qd7 was a serious blunder by Murray. Doubt if he published this game in the BCM.

Ian Thompson
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Re: Dave Rumens

Post by Ian Thompson » Sun Jul 16, 2017 10:18 am

Gordon Cadden wrote: 7. ..., Qd7 was a serious blunder by Murray. Doubt if he published this game in the BCM.
My computer doesn't agree with you, saying the position is equal.

It suggests 13...cxb2 was a serious error, giving a big advantage to White, when 13... Qb5 would have given Black a big advantage instead.

Gordon Cadden
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Re: Dave Rumens

Post by Gordon Cadden » Sun Jul 16, 2017 1:01 pm

Ian Thompson wrote:
Gordon Cadden wrote: 7. ..., Qd7 was a serious blunder by Murray. Doubt if he published this game in the BCM.
My computer doesn't agree with you, saying the position is equal.

It suggests 13...cxb2 was a serious error, giving a big advantage to White, when 13... Qb5 would have given Black a big advantage instead.
White can keep the game alive with 14. Qd1 + but he does appear to be running out of steam.

Gordon Cadden
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Re: Dave Rumens

Post by Gordon Cadden » Sun Jul 16, 2017 1:05 pm

Now have a copy of Carol Rumens " Double Exposure", which I can post on this forum, upon request. She did dedicate this poem to her husband, but I am uncertain of her motives. It is a " Warts and all " poem, and does not show Dave Rumens in a good light.

David Mabbs
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Re: Dave Rumens

Post by David Mabbs » Sun Jul 16, 2017 2:29 pm

Nick Ivell asked, "where was Dave Rumens in the 1960s ?". I can confirm that he spent the night of April 2nd-3rd, 1961, on the floor of East Ham Town Hall.

( I shall leave this post unfinished for the moment, to give anyone who wishes to the chance to find the reason why ! )

chrisobee
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Re: Dave Rumens

Post by chrisobee » Sun Jul 16, 2017 7:16 pm

Very sad news, I had the pleasure of playing on the same team as Dave for the DHSS. As well as being a very strong player he was also a very nice guy. As mentioned above his eligibility to play for the DHSS was somewhat dubious but as team captain for DHSS1 I was always pleased when he was available ! RIP Dave.
"Men who for truth and honour's sake
Stand fast and suffer long.
Brave men who work while others sleep,
Who dare while others fly...
They build a nation's pillars deep
And lift them to the sky. " Ralph Waldo Emerson

chrisobee
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Re: Dave Rumens

Post by chrisobee » Sun Jul 16, 2017 7:18 pm

Kevin Thurlow wrote:Not one of my good days (played in 1985). The other time I played him was even worse - he was an excellent player and interesting character.

Howard Williams memorably said to Rumens at one Civil Service League match, "Is your qualification for DHSS as an employee or a claimant?"
That was a very fair point Kevin but I was happy to have him on our side !
"Men who for truth and honour's sake
Stand fast and suffer long.
Brave men who work while others sleep,
Who dare while others fly...
They build a nation's pillars deep
And lift them to the sky. " Ralph Waldo Emerson

Kevin Thurlow
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Re: Dave Rumens

Post by Kevin Thurlow » Mon Jul 17, 2017 8:42 am

"Howard Williams memorably said to Rumens at one Civil Service League match, "Is your qualification for DHSS as an employee or a claimant?" "

In fairness to Howard, it was his answer to Dave's, "Hello, where are all the other Welsh Patzers?"

I understand it was a good-humoured exchange.

This thread has been the best obituary I've seen, for anyone who never met him, (ironically) it really brings Dave's character to life.

Gordon Cadden
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Re: Dave Rumens

Post by Gordon Cadden » Mon Jul 17, 2017 12:44 pm

Kevin Thurlow wrote:"Howard Williams memorably said to Rumens at one Civil Service League match, "Is your qualification for DHSS as an employee or a claimant?" "

In fairness to Howard, it was his answer to Dave's, "Hello, where are all the other Welsh Patzers?"

I understand it was a good-humoured exchange.

This thread has been the best obituary I've seen, for anyone who never met him, (ironically) it really brings Dave's character to life.
America had RJ Fischer, and we had DE Rumens. Dave was an itinerant chess player for much of his life. Sleeping at East Ham Town Hall, or with Andrew Martin, was a routine life style. Money was stuff that you shoved into slot machines, and also useful for playing Poker.
Dave did have his own computer business in the 1980's, but it went the same way as his car crash in Mexico. He ended up with so many creditors, that he fled his home. According to Bernard Haase, he spent some time kipping on Hampstead Heath.
He made a good recovery when he took up coaching.
Dave was never dull. He was good company, enjoyed a game of Poker in the evening. In later years, he switched to Bridge.
At Tournaments, spectators would often be drawn to his board. He usually played to win, accept possibly for a last round draw, which would give him a share of the prize money, or first place.

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Michael Farthing
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Re: Dave Rumens

Post by Michael Farthing » Mon Jul 17, 2017 1:12 pm

I have found two photographs in 'Chess' of Dave Rumens but do not have the means to post and in any case they are quite dark black and white's of not good quality. But for archivists with interest:

Vol 30 no 468 Mid-October 1964 p 21: Open section prizegiving at Eastbourne
Vol 42 no 769-70 (BHW often gave two numbers to a single issue) May 1977 p229 Prizegiving, Nottingham.

An interesting extract from the photograph caption in view of comments made above abut his career history:

"Simon (Webb) went on to make England's best score in Moscow but David withdrew from the team fearing to jeopardise a new job in engineering"

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Christopher Kreuzer
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Re: Dave Rumens

Post by Christopher Kreuzer » Mon Jul 17, 2017 1:14 pm

Are there photos of David Rumens available? I have a vague memory of being offered an hour's coaching one evening by someone who might have been David Rumens at a British Chess Championships (might have been Torquay in 1998 or 1999) and being taught a little bit more about an opening I was trying to play. Whatever it was about the lesson, it worked, and I've played those opening lines ever since! I am almost certain it was David Rumens, but a picture of him from the 1990s might help jog my memory...

Ah, I see a photo is here at the ECF obituary by Stewart Reuben:

http://www.englishchess.org.uk/david-rumens-rip/

Yes, that's him! :D

Two other wonderful photos there (and a lovely game as well).

Nick Ivell
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Re: Dave Rumens

Post by Nick Ivell » Mon Jul 17, 2017 7:29 pm

Thanks to Stewart for reminding us of the Rumens v Franklin game. It was a classic. Those of us who were on the scene in the 1970s learnt a lot from it. After seeing this game (it must have been published in CHESS) I started playing 6... Nxd5. I always felt this gave Black a comfortable game, although I'm sure there's a computer out there to prove me wrong...

Malcolm Clarke
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Re: Dave Rumens

Post by Malcolm Clarke » Mon Jul 17, 2017 9:01 pm

I think it is amazing that less than a day after his death was announced on here it had the record number of posts for an obituary, when you consider the number of prominent players and administrators whose deaths have been announced on here.

I did work at Euston Tower at the same time as Dave, but the only time I remember our paths crossing was at a DHSS club committee meeting, although I do remember reading references to his style of play in a YMCA chess club publication.

I am not sure how long Dave worked for the DHSS (Others might have a better idea than m), but I formed the impression that he more than satisfied the criterion to play for the team. In fact I recall people playing for departments in the Civil Service League that they had not worked for more than 10 years.

Anyway RIP to someone who was clearly very popular and well respected.

Reg Clucas
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Re: Dave Rumens

Post by Reg Clucas » Mon Jul 17, 2017 9:46 pm

I didn't know Dave Rumens personally, but I remember him well from congresses in the 70s & 80s. His games would always attract a crowd of onlookers.

At one Manchester congress, he was paired against a local player graded about 140 in the first round. I knew this player slightly, and he was a bit of an oddball. He had presumably read the story of a GM (Tal or Bronstein?) who sat for an hour before making his first move, allegedly because he wanted to envision every possible move. This lad did this against Rumens. After a few minutes, Rumens stood up and wandered around watching the other games, returning every so often to check if his opponent had moved. He showed no impatience, apart from at one point where I did see him roll his eyes skywards. After about an hour the lad moved, and of course was then demolished in short order.

I wonder if Dave related this story to anyone who knew him?

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