World Cadets Chess Championship 2017

National developments, strategies and ideas.
LawrenceCooper
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Re: World Cadets Chess Championship 2017

Post by LawrenceCooper » Thu Aug 31, 2017 9:55 am

NickFaulks wrote:In the final round, can any pairings expert tell me why Shreyas gets the downfloat?
I don't think there's an issue with being able to find an opponent for him in his score group so possibly his upfloat in round 6.

NickFaulks
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Re: World Cadets Chess Championship 2017

Post by NickFaulks » Thu Aug 31, 2017 10:31 am

LawrenceCooper wrote: so possibly his upfloat in round 6.
Ah, hadn't thought of that.

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IM Jack Rudd
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Re: World Cadets Chess Championship 2017

Post by IM Jack Rudd » Thu Aug 31, 2017 10:33 am

The upfloat in round 6 is long gone as a consideration. I think the line of reasoning goes:

Royal cannot play Ilamparthi, as they have already played. Thus Wei, as the next highest-rated, gets the upfloat.
This leaves Wang and Royal as possibilities for the downfloat. As Wang has just downfloated, Royal gets chosen as the downfloater.

Kevin Thurlow
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Re: World Cadets Chess Championship 2017

Post by Kevin Thurlow » Thu Aug 31, 2017 1:45 pm

"Royal cannot play Ilamparthi, as they have already played. Thus Wei, as the next highest-rated, gets the upfloat.
This leaves Wang and Royal as possibilities for the downfloat. As Wang has just downfloated, Royal gets chosen as the downfloater."

That does sound right.

LawrenceCooper
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Re: World Cadets Chess Championship 2017

Post by LawrenceCooper » Thu Aug 31, 2017 4:43 pm

IM Jack Rudd wrote:The upfloat in round 6 is long gone as a consideration. I think the line of reasoning goes:

Royal cannot play Ilamparthi, as they have already played. Thus Wei, as the next highest-rated, gets the upfloat.
This leaves Wang and Royal as possibilities for the downfloat. As Wang has just downfloated, Royal gets chosen as the downfloater.
A 5/5 finish for Shreyas leaves him on 8/11 which is likely to be 3rd or 4th= (depending on the top four boards) but probably out of the medals on tie-break.

Sohum finished on 6 and Daniel on 5.

LawrenceCooper
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Re: World Cadets Chess Championship 2017

Post by LawrenceCooper » Thu Aug 31, 2017 5:21 pm

Final Ranking after 11 Rounds
Rk. SNo Name Typ FED RtgI Pts. TB1 TB2 TB3 TB4 TB5 K rtg+/-
1 22 Emrikian Aren C USA 1408 9,0 0,0 68,5 71,0 6 9,0 40 146,8
2 1 Mishra Abhimanyu USA 1774 8,5 0,0 74,0 79,0 5 8,0 40 5,6
3 30 Tenuunbold Battulga MGL 1231 8,5 0,0 70,5 75,0 5 7,0 40 181,2
4 16 Ilamparthi A R IND 1492 8,0 0,0 74,0 79,0 6 7,0 40 122,0
5 2 CM Vetokhin Savva RUS 1757 8,0 0,0 71,0 75,0 6 8,0 40 -44,4
6 69 Wang Ningxuan CHN 0 8,0 0,0 68,0 73,0 5 7,0
7 3 CM Royal Shreyas ENG 1742 8,0 0,0 63,0 66,5 5 8,0 40 -24,8

John Higgs
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Re: World Cadets Chess Championship 2017

Post by John Higgs » Thu Aug 31, 2017 8:05 pm

The final cross-tables are up (tab across for your chosen age group):

http://www.chess-results.com/tnr295094. ... =30&wi=984

Well done to our six players.

:D

NickFaulks
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Re: World Cadets Chess Championship 2017

Post by NickFaulks » Thu Aug 31, 2017 11:19 pm

John Higgs wrote:Well done to our six players.
Yes, I can't imagine that an English junior squad has ever performed so well before in any World Championships. Well done to all and very encouraging for the future,

Richard Bates
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Re: World Cadets Chess Championship 2017

Post by Richard Bates » Fri Sep 01, 2017 5:01 am

NickFaulks wrote:
John Higgs wrote:Well done to our six players.
Yes, I can't imagine that an English junior squad has ever performed so well before in any World Championships. Well done to all and very encouraging for the future,
There is no doubt that the impression is somewhat better than in most events of recent years (probably in part due to the small size of the squad more akin to what was the norm in the past). But the first sentence is either hyperbole or tongue in cheek, I'm not sure!

John Higgs
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Re: World Cadets Chess Championship 2017

Post by John Higgs » Fri Sep 01, 2017 6:48 am

Round 11 report from Tibo Rushbrooke:

The competition is over and now the team is sitting on the bus back to São Paulo, reflecting on a memorable and successful trip. Let’s start off by going through today’s results.

​Shreyas was the first to finish his match. With a victory in the final round, he moved to 8 points out of 11 and secured joint 4th in the Under 8 section. By contrast, Daniel was the last English player out again; he’s become known as a long game specialist. After nearly 4 hours of concentration he eventually outmanoeuvred his opponent in an endgame and won his match, finishing on a respectable 5 points out of 11. We knew Sohum would have a tough game on 6 out of 10, and sure enough his opponent launched a deadly pawn storm against his king, and the attack proved too strong. Nevertheless Sohum finishes on 6 points, a very good score.

​James faced a very strong player today, rated 400 points higher than him at 1959. He managed to box in black’s king by controlling the dark squares around it, with a bishop on h6 and a pawn on f6, and used this to force a perpetual check with Rg4+, Kh8 and then Bg7+, Bh6+ etc. This was a very satisfying result against such a good opponent and James was happy with his final score of 6 out of 11.

​Remy lost his game after his opponent found a neat trick, decoying Remy’s king away from his rook, but Nilomi had a comfortable win. They finish on 6 out of 11 and 5.5 out of 11 respectively.

​So at the end of the tournament every player finishes on a good score; every player has had some pleasing and enjoyable wins; and every player has had defeats which they can learn from.

​Ciara Merriman (James’s younger sister) delivered the most powerful line of the 10-day period. Just before one of James’s matches, she said to his opponent ‘it doesn’t matter if you win or lose, it’s what you do with your dancing shoes’ and proceeded to do a little dance in front of him. Needless to say he was flummoxed. Thank you to Ciara for being so supportive throughout.

​Before I wrap these reports up, there are some important people we need to thank. We’d like to say a big thank you to GMs Neil McDonald and Jonathan Hawkins, for their patient coaching, thorough preparation and post-match analysis, and tireless work researching people’s openings. The children are extremely grateful for all their help and support.

We’d also like to thank John Merriman for doing such a great job as Head of Delegation. He organised everything very efficiently, was always checking that everyone was ok and did a brilliant job in his role.

Finally, we would like to thank the ECF, whose hard work organising travel, accommodation and all the crucial details made this expedition possible. Moreover we’d like to thank them for their ongoing support towards junior chess, helping our juniors to develop.

NickFaulks
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Re: World Cadets Chess Championship 2017

Post by NickFaulks » Fri Sep 01, 2017 7:21 am

Richard Bates wrote: But the first sentence is either hyperbole or tongue in cheek, I'm not sure!
No, it was genuine. Everyone seemed able to hold their own in very strong fields.

Perhaps I have not previously paid such close attention.

Alex Holowczak
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Re: World Cadets Chess Championship 2017

Post by Alex Holowczak » Fri Sep 01, 2017 10:36 am

NickFaulks wrote:
Richard Bates wrote: But the first sentence is either hyperbole or tongue in cheek, I'm not sure!
No, it was genuine. Everyone seemed able to hold their own in very strong fields.

Perhaps I have not previously paid such close attention.
I realise this is a statement more about other Federations than England, but the representation from many European countries seems a little disappointing.

There seemed to be plenty of Americans, Chinese, Indians and Russians at the top of each of the standings, which you'd expect. But it doesn't look like there were any players at all from Ukraine, Armenia or Azerbaijan. Europe seemed comparatively under-represented, compared with previous versions of the event.

I wonder, realising the people I'm wondering to aren't going to be able to answer, how many players were absent from the competition who would have added to the strength of the field, but are being kept under wraps by their Federations? Or maybe that this year's event was in South America was the problem?

Roger de Coverly
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Re: World Cadets Chess Championship 2017

Post by Roger de Coverly » Fri Sep 01, 2017 10:39 am

Alex Holowczak wrote: Europe seemed comparatively under-represented, compared with previous versions of the event.
Travel costs to South America would seem an obvious reason.

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Re: World Cadets Chess Championship 2017

Post by Alex Holowczak » Fri Sep 01, 2017 10:46 am

Roger de Coverly wrote:
Alex Holowczak wrote: Europe seemed comparatively under-represented, compared with previous versions of the event.
Travel costs to South America would seem an obvious reason.
Perhaps, but I'd be surprised if places like Armenia and Azerbaijan couldn't afford it, given the government support for chess in their countries.

The cost of getting to South Africa in 2014 was high. Intuitively and without doing any research to justify this comment at all, there seemed to be a bigger European contingent there.

LawrenceCooper
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Re: World Cadets Chess Championship 2017

Post by LawrenceCooper » Fri Sep 01, 2017 10:51 am

Alex Holowczak wrote:
Roger de Coverly wrote:
Alex Holowczak wrote: Europe seemed comparatively under-represented, compared with previous versions of the event.
Travel costs to South America would seem an obvious reason.
Perhaps, but I'd be surprised if places like Armenia and Azerbaijan couldn't afford it, given the government support for chess in their countries.

The cost of getting to South Africa in 2014 was high. Intuitively and without doing any research to justify this comment at all, there seemed to be a bigger European contingent there.
The cost is certainly higher but for English families these trips are already very expensive and so for the minority of families that are fortunate enough to be able to afford them the extra cost on flights (x2 or 3) won't necessarily deter them. At least the the event just finished fell reasonably conveniently in terms of school term dates compared to the 2014 World Schools albeit we somehow ended up with 12 players on that trip.

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