Chess Behind Bars

A book review may be a primary source, opinion piece, summary review or scholarly review.
John McKenna
Posts: 3333
Joined: Tue May 17, 2011 2:02 pm

Re: Chess Behind Bars

Post by John McKenna » Mon Sep 11, 2017 7:13 pm

Gordon Cadden wrote:
NickFaulks wrote:
Gordon Cadden wrote:John Healy was a vagrant
Isn't that racial abuse nowadays?
Would you prefer gentleman of the road, or hobo ?
'Hobo' is American English.

British English 'tramp' is more common here, or used to be, than 'vagrant'.

[Note that in American parlance a 'tramp' is a loose woman.]

As for "gentlemen of the road" that term was originally coined for mounted highwaymen.
The socially inferior infantry of the criminal fraternity were called 'footpads'.
To find a for(u)m that accommodates the mess, that is the task of the artist now. (Samuel Beckett)

Kevin Thurlow
Posts: 2368
Joined: Wed Apr 30, 2008 12:28 pm

Re: Chess Behind Bars

Post by Kevin Thurlow » Tue Sep 12, 2017 9:53 am

"Kevin, they haven't quoted your review!! "

The other reviewers were doubtless sent a copy of the book, and they supplied the publishers with the review. I bought the book and the publishers probably don't know I reviewed it. Or it could be that the other reviews are better written!

Tim Harding
Posts: 1461
Joined: Sat Oct 23, 2010 8:46 pm
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Contact:

Re: Chess Behind Bars

Post by Tim Harding » Sat Oct 28, 2017 7:17 pm

To get back to the book in question, does it mention Claude Bloodgood?
Tim Harding
Historian and Kibitzer

Author of 'British Chess Literature to 1914', Joseph Henry Blackburne: A Chess Biography', and 'Eminent Victorian Chess Players'
http://www.chessmail.com

Richard James
Posts: 936
Joined: Tue Apr 17, 2007 7:34 pm
Location: Twickenham
Contact:

Re: Chess Behind Bars

Post by Richard James » Sat Oct 28, 2017 7:50 pm

Tim Harding wrote:
Sat Oct 28, 2017 7:17 pm
To get back to the book in question, does it mention Claude Bloodgood?
Yes, there are two pages on Bloodgood, most of which is taken up by an annotated game. Nothing on Raymond Weinstein, though. Nor on chess in Broadmoor.

User avatar
Jon Mahony
Posts: 581
Joined: Sun Jun 14, 2009 10:47 pm
Location: Leeds
Contact:

Re: Chess Behind Bars

Post by Jon Mahony » Tue Dec 05, 2017 3:47 pm

Gordon Cadden wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:47 pm
AustinElliott wrote:
NickFaulks wrote: Isn't that racial abuse nowadays?
As the 1824 Vagrancy Act is still on the books in England, I would imagine a lawyer defending you from a libel action could argue that calling someone sleeping rough 'a vagrant' was a strictly factual description and thus carried no imputation of abuse. Whether they would win the argument is a different question... probably one for a lawyer.
If you had taken the trouble to read " The Grass Arena ", you would see that John Heal
y made it very clear that he occupied a bench at Lincolns Inn Fields. The grass arena was the field at Lincolns Inn.

John was a member of the Hampstead Club for a number of years, after he had achieved fame for his literary works. Not the strong player that he laid claim. No stronger than 140 ECF.
I read The Grass Arena myself some years ago, I have to say I wasn't overly taken with it - I got through it, but I found it quite disjointed and rambling in places. Very little chess either, for those who are picking it up for that - about 2 pages mention near end.
"When you see a good move, look for a better one!" - Lasker

User avatar
Jon Mahony
Posts: 581
Joined: Sun Jun 14, 2009 10:47 pm
Location: Leeds
Contact:

Re: Chess Behind Bars

Post by Jon Mahony » Tue Dec 05, 2017 3:51 pm

Richard James wrote:
Sat Oct 28, 2017 7:50 pm
Tim Harding wrote:
Sat Oct 28, 2017 7:17 pm
To get back to the book in question, does it mention Claude Bloodgood?
Yes, there are two pages on Bloodgood, most of which is taken up by an annotated game. Nothing on Raymond Weinstein, though. Nor on chess in Broadmoor.
There's quite a good chapter on Bloodgood in The Kings Gambit, by Paul Hoffman, I seem to remember it included an interview with his sister and the man himself.
"When you see a good move, look for a better one!" - Lasker

Geoff Chandler
Posts: 1787
Joined: Mon Jul 06, 2009 1:36 pm
Location: Under Cover
Contact:

Re: Chess Behind Bars

Post by Geoff Chandler » Mon Dec 18, 2017 3:16 am

Edward Winter has a piece about the topic title: 'Chess Behind Bars' concerning Jim Phelan.

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/phelan.html

The link mentions a brief chapter on chess at Parkhurst from
The Chess Player’s Bedside Book by R. Bott and S. Morrison
which per chance I only finished re-reading a few days ago when
hastily grabbing a bus-book for something to read.

Did a few stretches in the Army nick during my 9 years.
A couple of 10 days and a 21 days. AWOL and once for fighting and disturbing
the peace in Germany (that was in the wake of 3-2 1972 World Cup loss v
West Germany. Me and some mates got drunk and smashed things up in a German bar.)

They let me have a chess set, I heard one officer say:
"it's the only thing that appears to keep him out of trouble."
Me, a chess set and Clarke's book on Tal for 21 uninterrupted days. Bliss.

Never done any civilian time though been in Prison, Saughton loads of times
and once in Shotts playing the lads inside. I have a 100% record v the inmates.

User avatar
John Clarke
Posts: 313
Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2011 1:07 pm

Re: Chess Behind Bars

Post by John Clarke » Tue Dec 19, 2017 9:18 am

Encouragement of chess behind bars undoubtedly has merit, but I don't think the proponents would want the results to look like this:

(Detail from "Giles" cartoon, Dec 1966)
Attachments
ChessInJail.jpg
ChessInJail.jpg (269.06 KiB) Viewed 790 times
"The chess-board is the world ..... the player on the other side is hidden from us ..... he never overlooks a mistake, or makes the smallest allowance for ignorance."
(He doesn't let you resign and start again, either.)

Kevin Thurlow
Posts: 2368
Joined: Wed Apr 30, 2008 12:28 pm

Re: Chess Behind Bars

Post by Kevin Thurlow » Thu Dec 21, 2017 11:16 pm

"fighting and disturbing the peace in Germany (that was in the wake of 3-2 1972 World Cup loss v West Germany."

Er, 1970 surely, poor use of substitutes by Sir Alf.

Roger de Coverly
Posts: 16822
Joined: Tue Apr 15, 2008 2:51 pm

Re: Chess Behind Bars

Post by Roger de Coverly » Thu Dec 21, 2017 11:39 pm

Kevin Thurlow wrote:
Thu Dec 21, 2017 11:16 pm
Er, 1970 surely, poor use of substitutes by Sir Alf.
and might have cost Harold Wilson the 1970 General Election.

There was a subsequent loss to West Germany in the European Championships and the night the sixties party really ended at Wembley in 1973 with the Polish "clown" goalkeeper. It seemed immediately after that loss, that TV and the pubs starting shutting down at 10:30pm during the week, with the three day week to follow.

Post Reply