Candidates Tournament in Berlin March 2018

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AustinElliott
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Re: Candidates Tournament in Berlin March 2018

Post by AustinElliott » Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:01 pm

Tim Harding wrote:
Tue Mar 27, 2018 4:49 pm
Karjakin has dropped a pawn.
Wow. Wonder what he missed? Surely not Kxh3 g4+! ...? Certainly the sort of thing club players like me miss, but not a super-GM. Or are we putting it down to pressure? Karjakin always seems to have the strongest nerves of any of the top players.

A further thought: if Karjakin looks to be struggling to draw, and Kramnik-Shak looks even, and Grischuk-Caruana is heading for potentially mad time scramble.... would one think Caruana would take a draw? Or would Grischuk play on to try and help Karjakin? [EDIT: Grischuk has traded Qs, which I guess makes the time scramble a less ghastly prospect, but must surely help Caruana hold at least a draw.]

Another thought: Karjakin-Ding to trade all the heavy pieces to a classic 'good' Knight v 'bad' Bishop ending, with the bad Bishop having extra pawns?
Last edited by AustinElliott on Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:08 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Candidates Tournament in Berlin March 2018

Post by JustinHorton » Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:03 pm

I still don't think Ding's going to win this tournament but I think he might be the player who's enhanced his reputation the most over its course.
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Re: Candidates Tournament in Berlin March 2018

Post by Tim Harding » Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:07 pm

AustinElliott wrote:
Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:01 pm
Tim Harding wrote:
Tue Mar 27, 2018 4:49 pm
Karjakin has dropped a pawn.
Wow. Wonder what he missed? Surely not Kxh3 g4+! ...? Certainly the sort of thing club players like me miss, but not a super-GM. Or are we putting it down to pressure? Karjakin always seems to have the strongest nerves of any of the top players.

A further thought: if Karjakin looks to be struggling to draw, and Kramnik-Shak looks even, and Grischuk-Caruana is heading for potentially mad time scramble.... would one think Caruana would take a draw? Or would Grischuk play on to try and help Karjakin?

Another thought: Karjakin-Ding to trade all the heavy pieces to a classic 'good' Knight v 'bad' Bishop ending, with the bad Bishop having extra pawns?
Grischuk's mind is surely on making the time control before thinking about anything else.

Ding has to weigh winning a second pawn against keeping the knight in its box. Very impressive tournament by him - though he did survive a lost game versus Caruana and missed an easy win in another game (against Wesley So?).
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Re: Candidates Tournament in Berlin March 2018

Post by JustinHorton » Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:13 pm

You may be thinking of Grischuk
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Re: Candidates Tournament in Berlin March 2018

Post by Roger de Coverly » Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:16 pm

benedgell wrote:
Tue Mar 27, 2018 4:33 pm
I'd be interested in hearing a coach explain to a beginner why Ding putting all of his wns on the same colour as his remaining bishop is a good strategy.
From a practical viewpoint it acts as a glue or super pawn which holds the entire structure together. Whilst there are some positions best avoided, not all Bishop + same colour pawns v Knight are dodgy. The typical Samisch chain of c4, d5, e4, f3 with a Bishop on c2 is one such example.

If nothing else, Ding's play illustrates the practical value of a King's Indian style pile of heavy pieces on the f file.

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Re: Candidates Tournament in Berlin March 2018

Post by AustinElliott » Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:21 pm

The good-Knight v bad Bishop ending has duly arrived in Karjakin-Ding.

An interesting point in Grischuk-Caruana is whether Caruana might try ...Nxb4 cbx4 Bxb4 leaving him a pawn phalanx. With Grischuk having to make twenty moves in almost no minutes it would be fun to watch... probably too much of a gamble for the Candidates final round, though?
Last edited by AustinElliott on Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Candidates Tournament in Berlin March 2018

Post by Roger de Coverly » Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:26 pm

AustinElliott wrote:
Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:01 pm
Another thought: Karjakin-Ding to trade all the heavy pieces to a classic 'good' Knight v 'bad' Bishop ending, with the bad Bishop having extra pawns?
Which is what they've reached. White can reduce the deficit to one pawn by playing Kf2-g3xh3 . It may not be not that easy to win for Black to win, given the locked pawn chains.



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Re: Candidates Tournament in Berlin March 2018

Post by JustinHorton » Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:30 pm

AustinElliott wrote:
Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:21 pm

An interesting point in Grischuk-Caruana is whether Caruana might try ...Nxb4 cbx4 Bxb4 leaving him a pawn phalanx. With Grischuk having to make twenty moves in almost no minutes it would be fun to watch... probably too much of a gamble for the Candidates final round, though?
So it proved
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Re: Candidates Tournament in Berlin March 2018

Post by Chris Goodall » Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:31 pm

Roger de Coverly wrote:
Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:26 pm
Which is what they've reached. White can reduce the deficit to one pawn by playing Kf2-g3xh3 . It may not be not that easy to win for Black to win, given the locked pawn chains.


Well as good knights go, that's a terrible knight. Doesn't ...Bd8 just immobilise White completely? Even if the king picks up the h3 pawn, Black just walks his own king to b5 and queens the a-pawn, no?
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Re: Candidates Tournament in Berlin March 2018

Post by Roger de Coverly » Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:37 pm

Chris Wardle wrote:
Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:31 pm
Well as good knights go, that's a terrible knight.
Karjakin seems to agree, as he's regrouped with Nd5-e7-f5-g3. That gives Black the d5 break now.

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Re: Candidates Tournament in Berlin March 2018

Post by JustinHorton » Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:42 pm

Mamedyarov has just put his foot in it
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Re: Candidates Tournament in Berlin March 2018

Post by Chris Goodall » Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:45 pm

Mind I thought Grischuk had 27.Rxd5, so I might not be a world champion yet. Clearly Grischuk saw it was defended by a pawn.
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Re: Candidates Tournament in Berlin March 2018

Post by Tim Harding » Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:48 pm

JustinHorton wrote:
Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:42 pm
Mamedyarov has just put his foot in it
Comments like that (without a specific move reference) aren't very helpful because the position may have changed by the time anyone reads it.
What precisely do you mean?
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Re: Candidates Tournament in Berlin March 2018

Post by Tim Harding » Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:49 pm

Caruana's clock is a big worry, what time does he really have left?
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Re: Candidates Tournament in Berlin March 2018

Post by LawrenceCooper » Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:56 pm

Tim Harding wrote:
Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:49 pm
Caruana's clock is a big worry, what time does he really have left?
To answer that we would need to know at what point and what move you were refering to.

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