Sir George Alan Thomas

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Tryfon Gavriel
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Sir George Alan Thomas

Post by Tryfon Gavriel » Fri Dec 20, 2013 6:17 pm

Hi all

I am quite fascinated that Thomas beat both Capablanca and Botvinnik in the same tournament:

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?tid=79240

Does anyone have his 1896 simul win vs Emanual Lasker as pgn ?! I might do a view videos about him for my evolution of chess style series

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL776C6E4E40EDC3E6

Cheers, Tryfon
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Matt Mackenzie
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Re: Sir George Allan Thomas

Post by Matt Mackenzie » Fri Dec 20, 2013 6:35 pm

Not just in the same tournament, but in successive games IIRC :shock:

It is "Alan", btw :wink:
"Set up your attacks so that when the fire is out, it isn't out!" (H N Pillsbury)

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Gerard Killoran
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Re: Sir George Allan Thomas

Post by Gerard Killoran » Sat Dec 21, 2013 10:57 pm

Found it!

CHESS .
Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc (Portsmouth, England), Saturday, April 25, 1896; Issue 5980.

Category: Sports
Sourced from the British Library

<http://find.galegroup.com/bncn/infomark ... =1.0>.Gale Document Number: BC3206169808

Mr. E. Lasker gave a public exhibition of simultaneous play at the Criterion Restaurant, London, on Saturday, when 28 opponents responded to his invitation. Among those who took part in the proceedings were Lady Thomas and Mr. G. A. Thomas, both residents of Southsea; the latter, indeed, after very spirited play, succeeded in winning his game of the champion. Mr. Lasker ultimately won 20 and lost only two of the number contested. The following is Mr. Thomas' game.


[Event "Simultaneous Exhibition"]
[Site "Criterion Restaurant, London"]
[Date "1896.04.18"]
[Round "1 of 28"]
[White "Lasker, Emanuel"]
[Black "Thomas, George Allan"]
[Result "0-1"]
[PlyCount "58"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bxb4 5. c3 Ba5 6. d4 exd4 7. O-O d6 8.cxd4 Bg4 9. Qa4 Bxf3 10. gxf3 Qf6 11. Bb5 Nge7 12. d5 Qxa1 13. dxc6 b6 14. Qb3 Qf6 15. Na3 Qc3 16. Qd1 a6 17. Ba4 Ng6 18. Nc2 Ne5 19. Be3 Qd3 20. Nd4 Bc3 21.
Nf5 Qxd1 22. Bxd1 O-O-O 23. Be2 Kb8 24. Bxa6 Nxf3+ 25. Kg2 Nd2 26. Bxd2 Bxd2 27. Ne7 Rhe8 28. Nd5 Rxe4 29. Rb1 Ba5 0-1


Paul McKeown
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Re: Sir George Allan Thomas

Post by Paul McKeown » Sat Dec 21, 2013 11:39 pm

You don't exactly get the feeling that Manny Lasker was working at full stretch there...!

Geoff Chandler
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Re: Sir George Allan Thomas

Post by Geoff Chandler » Sun Dec 22, 2013 4:31 am

Hi, Paul.

Yes indeed, a very un-lasker like type of game.

This position, Black to play.



Thomas comes out of this glowing because in a simul v the current World Champion
who amongst us would not play 11...Qxf3 going for the perpetual Qg4+-Qf3+ which
looks like it can hardly be avoided, (12.Bxc6+ bxc6 13.Qxc6+ Ke7) and dine out for years on the draw v Lasker.
(Is this what Lasker was expecting, are there tricks in there after 11..Qxf3.)

Instead Thomas shuns the perpetual and played 11...Ne7 quite willing to give up the a5 Bishop to QxB.
Lasker never took it. Yes Black gets play for it but it looks rather unclear with
a World Champion circling the room knowing you must move when he appears at your board. Brave play.

Gordon Cadden
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Re: Sir George Allan Thomas

Post by Gordon Cadden » Sun Dec 22, 2013 12:23 pm

We must not forget Sir George Alan Thomas. Winner of the Hampstead Championship Trophy, in 1920. Sir George also played for the City of London Club, the Metropolitan Club, and I believe, the West London Chess Club.
He was on the receiving end of the most famous combination ever played, against Edward Lasker, at the City of London Club, 1912.
After inheriting a Baronetcy, he had the financial means to pursue his love of Badminton, and Chess.
Sir George kept in touch with the game, long after retiring. I remember seeing him at the British Chess Championships, in the early 1960's.
Probably the last of the gentleman players.

Geoff Chandler
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Re: Sir George Allan Thomas

Post by Geoff Chandler » Sun Dec 22, 2013 2:19 pm

Hi Gordon,

"He was on the receiving end of the most famous combination ever played..."

One of the most famous, :wink: we had a forum discussion about this ages ago.

This game is also infamous for being one the most mis-copied games ever.....er.......copied.

Chaos in a Miniature.

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extr ... homas.html

Mr. Winter gives the full background and the different move orders.

BTW Gerrard, smashing find.

Tryfon Gavriel
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Re: Sir George Allan Thomas

Post by Tryfon Gavriel » Sun Dec 22, 2013 9:07 pm

Many thanks Gerard Killoran and all

Very interesting stuff
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Gordon Cadden
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Re: Sir George Allan Thomas

Post by Gordon Cadden » Mon Dec 23, 2013 5:40 am

Geoff Chandler wrote:Hi Gordon,

"He was on the receiving end of the most famous combination ever played..."

One of the most famous, :wink: we had a forum discussion about this ages ago.

This game is also infamous for being one the most mis-copied games ever.....er.......copied.

Chaos in a Miniature.

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extr ... homas.html

Mr. Winter gives the full background and the different move orders.

BTW Gerrard, smashing find.
Dear Geoff,

I accept your correction; "One of the best known combinations", would be more acceptable.

I am a relatively new boy to this Forum. Note that you have consulted God (Winter). Have not been to church lately, but I do have the faith. There must be a star over Geneva.

Here is a challenge for you Geoff. Produce a genuine image of Edward Winter on this Forum, and I will send you a cheque for £100, payable to a nominated charity of your choice.

The earliest day that I can post the cheque, will be Wednesday the 25th December, and that is the deadline for you to produce that image. Will c/o Edinburgh Chess Club suffice ?

Geoff Chandler
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Re: Sir George Alan Thomas

Post by Geoff Chandler » Mon Dec 23, 2013 12:42 pm

Hi Gordon,

It was just a wee joke rather than being anything pedantic.

I'm afraid I cannot accept your offer.

I doubt if I could get a group photograph of them all together.
(the clue is in the constant use of the term 'we').
I thought eveyone knew this, he is a they.


Edit:
Re-read thread.
I knew there was something bugging me....

Gordon Cadden
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Re: Sir George Alan Thomas

Post by Gordon Cadden » Mon Dec 23, 2013 1:11 pm

Geoff Chandler wrote:Hi Gordon,

It was just a wee joke rather than being anything pedantic.

I'm afraid I cannot accept your offer.

I doubt if I could get a group photograph of them all together.
(the clue is in the constant use of the term 'we').
I thought eveyone knew this, he is a they.


Edit:
Re-read thread.
I knew there was something bugging me....
That is big news to this member Geoff. You mean that GOD does not exist ???

Geoff Chandler
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Re: Sir George Alan Thomas

Post by Geoff Chandler » Mon Dec 23, 2013 2:13 pm

Hi Gordon.

They exist, it's a selective club, a team of dedicated researchers shrouded in more mystery than the Masons.

I wanted in but they think I'm...what was the word they used?

"A scatter brain." yes, that was it.

Anyway enough of that. I knew something was nipping at my lugs.
My Freudian plea: "....are there tricks in there after 11..Qxf3"

I could not see if there was because my wee brain (my wee scattered brain)
was trying to latch onto something I had very recently read.

A few months ago I was playing over at random some games from
Reinfeld's book 'The Unknown Alekhine' and I met this.
(or as Edward Winter would say; "we met this.')

Alekhine catches Lasker in the same perpetual pattern Sir George declined against Lasker.

I speculate that had Sir George played the perpetual v Lasker, Lasker
would have stored the idea and seen what Alekhine was up to and prevented it.
The loss would have broke Alekhine's heart and he would have given up Chess.
With no Alekhine to inspire Kasparov, Karpov would have World Champion for another 10 years.

So on that breezy April evening of 1896 Sir George Thomas played a game that
set the course for chess history as we know it today.

Lasker - Alekhine St.Petersburg 1914


Tryfon Gavriel
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Re: Sir George Alan Thomas

Post by Tryfon Gavriel » Mon Dec 23, 2013 3:12 pm

Just for those interested, George Alan Thomas did suffer quite badly in general against Capablanca:

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ezsearch ... +vs+thomas

Classical games: Jose Raul Capablanca beat George Alan Thomas 6 to 1, with 4 draws.
Including rapid/exhibition games: Jose Raul Capablanca beat George Alan Thomas 7 to 1, with 4 draws.
Only rapid/exhibition games: Jose Raul Capablanca beat George Alan Thomas 1 to 0.
*The figures above are based only on games present in our database which may be incomplete.

But this was one Hastings he had an amazing performance.

The real trajedy in my findings is for the "Uncrowned King" Paul Keres

Checking for example these tournaments up to the start of World War II, clearly Keres was possibly one of the strongest players in the world:

Margate 1937
http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chesscol ... id=1012257

Margate 1939
http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chesscol ... id=1016676

[Event "Margate"]
[Site "Margate ENG"]
[Date "1939.04.14"]
[EventDate "1939.04.12"]
[Round "3"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "George Alan Thomas"]
[Black "Paul Keres"]
[ECO "C91"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "86"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O d6 6. Re1 b5
7. Bb3 Be7 8. c3 O-O 9. d4 Bg4 10. d5 Na5 11. Bc2 c5 12. Nbd2
Ne8 13. Nf1 g6 14. Ne3 Bd7 15. b4 Nb7 16. a4 Ng7 17. h3 Qc7
18. Qd2 Rfc8 19. Bb2 f5 20. exf5 gxf5 21. axb5 axb5 22. Rxa8
Rxa8 23. g4 Rf8 24. Nxf5 Nxf5 25. gxf5 Bxf5 26. Bxf5 Rxf5
27. Qd3 Qd7 28. Re4 h5 29. Bc1 Rf7 30. Ng5 Bxg5 31. Bxg5 Qf5
32. Qe3 cxb4 33. cxb4 Rg7 34. h4 Nd8 35. Qe2 Nf7 36. Re3 Nxg5
37. hxg5 h4 38. Qxb5 Qxg5+ 39. Kf1 Qg2+ 40. Ke1 Rf7 41. f3 h3
42. Qf1 Rg7 43. Qb5 Qg5 0-1

I don't know if it is generally agreed that because in the post-war Avro

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Ches ... nship_1948

It is thought that Keres basically had to throw his games against Botvinnik - this is correct isn't it ?!

Anyway, as far as my evolution of style series, I think the evidence is also clear that leading up to 1939, Keres was one of the biggest guns on the scene, and probably should be emphasised as such on any historical tour leading up to both the pre-war and post-war AVRO tournaments.

1939 in Chess is of interest given World war II declared 1st September 1939 to last 6 years and one day:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1939_in_chess

Cheers, Tryfon
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Roger de Coverly
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Re: Sir George Alan Thomas

Post by Roger de Coverly » Mon Dec 23, 2013 3:33 pm

Tryfon Gavriel wrote: It is thought that Keres basically had to throw his games against Botvinnik - this is correct isn't it ?!
It's one of those things that chess historians can argue endlessly about. But both in 1948 and in 1951 against Bronstein, Botvinnik would have been the preferred champion of the Soviet establishment.

Golombek's 1960s book on Keres leaps from Keres playing in Nazi era tournaments to the post war Soviet Championships without explaining how this was done without him being locked up as a traitor.

For credibility as a World Champion, Botvinnik had to be seen to have beaten the next best. That presumably allowed Keres to resume his chess career even where lesser known players disappeared.

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Matt Mackenzie
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Re: Sir George Alan Thomas

Post by Matt Mackenzie » Mon Dec 23, 2013 6:16 pm

The evidence that Keres was "forced to throw" his games against Botvinnik in 1948 is at best circumstancial and inconclusive - and was much exaggerated by cynical cold warriors like the egregious, facts-averse Larry Evans. The evidence, in contrast, that he was put under considerable pressure - and that it was "made known" in no uncertain terms that the Soviet authorities would "prefer" him not to emerge as the challenger - is, however, pretty overwhelming.

How that affected his actual play can only be speculated about, of course (but his record against MMB outside this tournament was none too hot, either)

Taylor Kingston wrote the best analysis I have seen on the topic, a few years ago now.
"Set up your attacks so that when the fire is out, it isn't out!" (H N Pillsbury)

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